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Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility.
Methods Mol Biol. 2016; 1454:245-54.MM

Abstract

Planarian flatworms are carnivorous invertebrates with astounding regenerative properties. They have a ventral surface on which thousands of motile cilia are exposed to the extracellular environment. These beat in a synchronized manner against secreted mucus thereby propelling the animal forward. Similar to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is easy to maintain in the laboratory and is highly amenable to simple RNAi approaches through feeding with dsRNA. The methods are simple and robust, and the level of gene expression reduction that can be obtained is, in many cases, almost total. Moreover, cilia assembly and function is not essential for viability in this organism, as animals readily survive for weeks even with the apparent total absence of this organelle. Both genome and expressed sequence tag databases are available and allow design of vectors to target any desired gene of choice. Combined, these feature make planaria a useful model system in which to examine ciliary assembly and motility, especially in the context of a ciliated epithelium where many organelles beat in a hydrodynamically coupled synchronized manner. In addition, as planaria secrete mucus against which the cilia beat to generate propulsive force, this system may also prove useful for analysis of mucociliary interactions. In this chapter, we provide simple methods to maintain a planarian colony, knockdown gene expression by RNAi, and analyze the resulting animals for whole organism motility as well as ciliary architecture and function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT, 06030-3305, USA. king@uchc.edu. Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT, 06030-3305, USA. king@uchc.edu.Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT, 06030-3305, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27514927

Citation

King, Stephen M., and Ramila S. Patel-King. "Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility." Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 1454, 2016, pp. 245-54.
King SM, Patel-King RS. Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility. Methods Mol Biol. 2016;1454:245-54.
King, S. M., & Patel-King, R. S. (2016). Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility. Methods in Molecular Biology (Clifton, N.J.), 1454, 245-54. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3789-9_16
King SM, Patel-King RS. Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility. Methods Mol Biol. 2016;1454:245-54. PubMed PMID: 27514927.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Planaria as a Model System for the Analysis of Ciliary Assembly and Motility. AU - King,Stephen M, AU - Patel-King,Ramila S, PY - 2016/8/13/entrez PY - 2016/8/16/pubmed PY - 2018/1/13/medline KW - Axoneme KW - Cilia KW - Dynein KW - Microtubule KW - Planaria SP - 245 EP - 54 JF - Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) JO - Methods Mol. Biol. VL - 1454 N2 - Planarian flatworms are carnivorous invertebrates with astounding regenerative properties. They have a ventral surface on which thousands of motile cilia are exposed to the extracellular environment. These beat in a synchronized manner against secreted mucus thereby propelling the animal forward. Similar to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is easy to maintain in the laboratory and is highly amenable to simple RNAi approaches through feeding with dsRNA. The methods are simple and robust, and the level of gene expression reduction that can be obtained is, in many cases, almost total. Moreover, cilia assembly and function is not essential for viability in this organism, as animals readily survive for weeks even with the apparent total absence of this organelle. Both genome and expressed sequence tag databases are available and allow design of vectors to target any desired gene of choice. Combined, these feature make planaria a useful model system in which to examine ciliary assembly and motility, especially in the context of a ciliated epithelium where many organelles beat in a hydrodynamically coupled synchronized manner. In addition, as planaria secrete mucus against which the cilia beat to generate propulsive force, this system may also prove useful for analysis of mucociliary interactions. In this chapter, we provide simple methods to maintain a planarian colony, knockdown gene expression by RNAi, and analyze the resulting animals for whole organism motility as well as ciliary architecture and function. SN - 1940-6029 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27514927/Planaria_as_a_Model_System_for_the_Analysis_of_Ciliary_Assembly_and_Motility_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3789-9_16 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -