Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal Folate Intake during Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2017 01 15; 195(2):221-228.AJ

Abstract

RATIONALE

A potential adverse effect of high folate intake during pregnancy on children's asthma development remains controversial.

OBJECTIVES

To prospectively investigate folate intake from both food and supplements during pregnancy and asthma at age 7 years when the diagnosis is more reliable than at preschool age.

METHODS

This study included eligible children born 2002-2006 from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort, linked to the Norwegian Prescription Database. Current asthma at age 7 was defined by asthma medications dispensed at least twice in the year (1,901 cases; n = 39,846) or by maternal questionnaire report (1,624 cases; n = 28,872). Maternal folate intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire validated against plasma folate. We used log-binomial and multinomial regression to calculate adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

Risk of asthma was increased in the highest versus lowest quintile of total folate intake with an adjusted relative risk of 1.23 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.44) that was similar for maternally reported asthma. Mothers in the highest quintile had a relatively high intake of food folate (median, 308; interquartile range, 241-366 μg/d) and nearly all took at least 400 μg/d of supplemental folic acid (median, 500; interquartile range, 400-600 μg/d).

CONCLUSIONS

In this large prospective population-based cohort with essentially complete follow-up, pregnant women taking supplemental folic acid at or above the recommended dose, combined with a diet rich in folate, reach a total folate intake level associated with a slightly increased risk of asthma in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and. 2 Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and. 3 Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit and. 4 School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and.5 Department of Exposure and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.6 Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Department of Nutrition, and.7 Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. 8 Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; and.9 Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway.1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and. 10 Department of Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and.1 Department of Mental and Physical Health and.2 Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27518161

Citation

Parr, Christine L., et al. "Maternal Folate Intake During Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 195, no. 2, 2017, pp. 221-228.
Parr CL, Magnus MC, Karlstad Ø, et al. Maternal Folate Intake during Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2017;195(2):221-228.
Parr, C. L., Magnus, M. C., Karlstad, Ø., Haugen, M., Refsum, H., Ueland, P. M., McCann, A., Nafstad, P., Håberg, S. E., Nystad, W., & London, S. J. (2017). Maternal Folate Intake during Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 195(2), 221-228. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201604-0788OC
Parr CL, et al. Maternal Folate Intake During Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2017 01 15;195(2):221-228. PubMed PMID: 27518161.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal Folate Intake during Pregnancy and Childhood Asthma in a Population-based Cohort. AU - Parr,Christine L, AU - Magnus,Maria C, AU - Karlstad,Øystein, AU - Haugen,Margaretha, AU - Refsum,Helga, AU - Ueland,Per M, AU - McCann,Adrian, AU - Nafstad,Per, AU - Håberg,Siri E, AU - Nystad,Wenche, AU - London,Stephanie J, PY - 2016/8/16/pubmed PY - 2017/7/7/medline PY - 2016/8/13/entrez KW - birth cohort KW - children’s asthma development KW - epidemiology KW - folic acid KW - maternal diet SP - 221 EP - 228 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am J Respir Crit Care Med VL - 195 IS - 2 N2 - RATIONALE: A potential adverse effect of high folate intake during pregnancy on children's asthma development remains controversial. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate folate intake from both food and supplements during pregnancy and asthma at age 7 years when the diagnosis is more reliable than at preschool age. METHODS: This study included eligible children born 2002-2006 from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort, linked to the Norwegian Prescription Database. Current asthma at age 7 was defined by asthma medications dispensed at least twice in the year (1,901 cases; n = 39,846) or by maternal questionnaire report (1,624 cases; n = 28,872). Maternal folate intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire validated against plasma folate. We used log-binomial and multinomial regression to calculate adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Risk of asthma was increased in the highest versus lowest quintile of total folate intake with an adjusted relative risk of 1.23 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.44) that was similar for maternally reported asthma. Mothers in the highest quintile had a relatively high intake of food folate (median, 308; interquartile range, 241-366 μg/d) and nearly all took at least 400 μg/d of supplemental folic acid (median, 500; interquartile range, 400-600 μg/d). CONCLUSIONS: In this large prospective population-based cohort with essentially complete follow-up, pregnant women taking supplemental folic acid at or above the recommended dose, combined with a diet rich in folate, reach a total folate intake level associated with a slightly increased risk of asthma in children. SN - 1535-4970 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27518161/Maternal_Folate_Intake_during_Pregnancy_and_Childhood_Asthma_in_a_Population_based_Cohort_ L2 - https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.201604-0788OC?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -