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Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education.
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Nov - Dec; 48(10):683-690.e1.JN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine among low-income mothers the consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), high-fat foods, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and overall diet quality in relation to levels of reach of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) interventions across 2,907 California census tracts.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional telephone survey conducted from April through October, 2014 using the Automated Self-administered 24-Hour Recall dietary assessment.

PARTICIPANTS

Mothers or primary caregivers (n = 6,355) from randomly selected SNAP households. The sample was 42.6% Latina, 25.5% white, and 17.6% African American. The response rate was 60.5%.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Cups of FV; calories from high-fat foods; and cups of SSBs, overall and from items purchased from fast-food restaurants. Overall diet quality was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index-2010.

ANALYSIS

Linear regression controlling for race/ethnicity and education, with significance at P ≤ .05.

RESULTS

Mothers from high SNAP-Ed reach census tracts ate more cups of FV, consumed fewer calories from high-fat foods, and drank fewer cups of SSBs. Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores did not vary by levels of SNAP-Ed reach.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education interventions are related to increased intake of FV and decreased consumption of high-fat foods and SSBs, but not overall diet quality. Future studies should include assessment of physical activity to investigate caloric balance in association with levels of SNAP-Ed interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, Sacramento, CA. Electronic address: Fred.Molitor@mhsoac.ca.gov.Public Health Institute Center for Wellness and Nutrition, Sacramento, CA.Research and Evaluation Section, Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Branch, California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27527908

Citation

Molitor, Fred, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education." Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, vol. 48, no. 10, 2016, pp. 683-690.e1.
Molitor F, Sugerman SB, Sciortino S. Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016;48(10):683-690.e1.
Molitor, F., Sugerman, S. B., & Sciortino, S. (2016). Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 48(10), 683-e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2016.07.002
Molitor F, Sugerman SB, Sciortino S. Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016 Nov - Dec;48(10):683-690.e1. PubMed PMID: 27527908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and Vegetable, Fat, and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Low-Income Mothers Living in Neighborhoods With Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education. AU - Molitor,Fred, AU - Sugerman,Sharon B, AU - Sciortino,Stan, Y1 - 2016/08/12/ PY - 2016/02/26/received PY - 2016/07/06/revised PY - 2016/07/08/accepted PY - 2016/8/17/pubmed PY - 2017/10/17/medline PY - 2016/8/17/entrez KW - 24-hour recall KW - SNAP-Ed KW - ecological KW - fat KW - fruit KW - mother KW - nutrition education KW - sugar-sweetened beverage KW - vegetable SP - 683 EP - 690.e1 JF - Journal of nutrition education and behavior JO - J Nutr Educ Behav VL - 48 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine among low-income mothers the consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), high-fat foods, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and overall diet quality in relation to levels of reach of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) interventions across 2,907 California census tracts. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey conducted from April through October, 2014 using the Automated Self-administered 24-Hour Recall dietary assessment. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers or primary caregivers (n = 6,355) from randomly selected SNAP households. The sample was 42.6% Latina, 25.5% white, and 17.6% African American. The response rate was 60.5%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cups of FV; calories from high-fat foods; and cups of SSBs, overall and from items purchased from fast-food restaurants. Overall diet quality was assessed by the Healthy Eating Index-2010. ANALYSIS: Linear regression controlling for race/ethnicity and education, with significance at P ≤ .05. RESULTS: Mothers from high SNAP-Ed reach census tracts ate more cups of FV, consumed fewer calories from high-fat foods, and drank fewer cups of SSBs. Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores did not vary by levels of SNAP-Ed reach. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education interventions are related to increased intake of FV and decreased consumption of high-fat foods and SSBs, but not overall diet quality. Future studies should include assessment of physical activity to investigate caloric balance in association with levels of SNAP-Ed interventions. SN - 1878-2620 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27527908/Fruit_and_Vegetable_Fat_and_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_Among_Low_Income_Mothers_Living_in_Neighborhoods_With_Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_Education_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1499-4046(16)30658-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -