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Hypokalemia in cats: 186 cases (1984-1987).
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1989 Jun 01; 194(11):1604-8.JA

Abstract

Retrospective review of serum biochemical data obtained from 501 cats over a 3-year period (1984-1987) indicated that 186 (37%) had hypokalemia (serum potassium concentration less than 4.1 mEq/L). After adjusting for disease diagnosis, cats fed either of 2 commercial diets were 4 times more likely to be hypokalemic than cats fed other diets. Odds ratios (OR; measure of association), adjusted for diet type, were calculated to determine the odds of hypokalemia for a given disease, compared with odds of normokalemia for the same disease. Chronic renal failure (OR = 14.4), hepatic disease (OR = 5.7), systemic infectious diseases (viral or bacterial; OR = 2.7), and neuromuscular or CNS disease (OR = 2.4) were all significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with the occurrence of hypokalemia. Significant differences in age or sex between hypokalemic and normokalemic cats were not found. Within the group of 186 hypokalemic cats, hypercholesterolemia (89 cats; 48%), hyperglycemia (88 cats; 47%), high serum urea nitrogen concentration (86 cats; 46%), hyperchloridemia (80 cats; 43%), and high serum creatinine concentration (73 cats; 39%) were the most common biochemical abnormalities. When disease diagnosis was compared among cats with severe hypokalemia (serum potassium concentration less than 3.0 mEq/L) and those with moderate hypokalemia, cats with severe hypokalemia were 3.5 times more likely to have chronic renal failure than cats with less severe hypokalemia.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2753783

Citation

Dow, S W., et al. "Hypokalemia in Cats: 186 Cases (1984-1987)." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 194, no. 11, 1989, pp. 1604-8.
Dow SW, Fettman MJ, Curtis CR, et al. Hypokalemia in cats: 186 cases (1984-1987). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1989;194(11):1604-8.
Dow, S. W., Fettman, M. J., Curtis, C. R., & LeCouteur, R. A. (1989). Hypokalemia in cats: 186 cases (1984-1987). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 194(11), 1604-8.
Dow SW, et al. Hypokalemia in Cats: 186 Cases (1984-1987). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1989 Jun 1;194(11):1604-8. PubMed PMID: 2753783.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hypokalemia in cats: 186 cases (1984-1987). AU - Dow,S W, AU - Fettman,M J, AU - Curtis,C R, AU - LeCouteur,R A, PY - 1989/6/1/pubmed PY - 1989/6/1/medline PY - 1989/6/1/entrez SP - 1604 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 194 IS - 11 N2 - Retrospective review of serum biochemical data obtained from 501 cats over a 3-year period (1984-1987) indicated that 186 (37%) had hypokalemia (serum potassium concentration less than 4.1 mEq/L). After adjusting for disease diagnosis, cats fed either of 2 commercial diets were 4 times more likely to be hypokalemic than cats fed other diets. Odds ratios (OR; measure of association), adjusted for diet type, were calculated to determine the odds of hypokalemia for a given disease, compared with odds of normokalemia for the same disease. Chronic renal failure (OR = 14.4), hepatic disease (OR = 5.7), systemic infectious diseases (viral or bacterial; OR = 2.7), and neuromuscular or CNS disease (OR = 2.4) were all significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with the occurrence of hypokalemia. Significant differences in age or sex between hypokalemic and normokalemic cats were not found. Within the group of 186 hypokalemic cats, hypercholesterolemia (89 cats; 48%), hyperglycemia (88 cats; 47%), high serum urea nitrogen concentration (86 cats; 46%), hyperchloridemia (80 cats; 43%), and high serum creatinine concentration (73 cats; 39%) were the most common biochemical abnormalities. When disease diagnosis was compared among cats with severe hypokalemia (serum potassium concentration less than 3.0 mEq/L) and those with moderate hypokalemia, cats with severe hypokalemia were 3.5 times more likely to have chronic renal failure than cats with less severe hypokalemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2753783/Hypokalemia_in_cats:_186_cases__1984_1987__ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -