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Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones.
J Urol 2017; 197(2):405-410JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

Kidney stones are a common and painful condition. Longitudinal prospective studies on the association between the intake of vitamin D and the risk of incident kidney stones are lacking.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We performed a prospective analysis of 193,551 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study I and II. Participants were divided into categories of total (less than 100, 100 to 199, 200 to 399, 400 to 599, 600 to 999, 1,000 IU per day or greater) and supplemental (none, less than 400, 400 to 599, 600 to 999, 1,000 IU per day or greater) vitamin D intake. During a followup of 3,316,846 person-years there were 6,576 incident kidney stone events. Cox proportional hazards regression models were adjusted for age, body mass index, comorbidities, use of medications and intake of other nutrients.

RESULTS

After multivariate adjustment there was no statistically significant association between vitamin D intake and risk of stones in the HPFS (HR for 1,000 or greater vs less than 100 IU per day 1.08, 95% CI 0.80, 1.47, p for trend = 0.92) and the NHS I (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.73, 1.35, p for trend = 0.70), whereas there was a suggestion of a higher risk in the NHS II (HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.94, 1.48, p for trend = 0.02). Similar results were found for supplemental vitamin D intake.

CONCLUSIONS

Vitamin D intake in typical amounts was not statistically associated with risk of kidney stone formation, although higher risk with higher doses than those studied here cannot be excluded.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: pietromanuel.ferraro@unicatt.it.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine.Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27545576

Citation

Ferraro, Pietro Manuel, et al. "Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones." The Journal of Urology, vol. 197, no. 2, 2017, pp. 405-410.
Ferraro PM, Taylor EN, Gambaro G, et al. Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. J Urol. 2017;197(2):405-410.
Ferraro, P. M., Taylor, E. N., Gambaro, G., & Curhan, G. C. (2017). Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. The Journal of Urology, 197(2), pp. 405-410. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2016.08.084.
Ferraro PM, et al. Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. J Urol. 2017;197(2):405-410. PubMed PMID: 27545576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D Intake and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones. AU - Ferraro,Pietro Manuel, AU - Taylor,Eric N, AU - Gambaro,Giovanni, AU - Curhan,Gary C, Y1 - 2016/08/18/ PY - 2016/08/12/accepted PY - 2016/8/23/pubmed PY - 2019/1/12/medline PY - 2016/8/23/entrez KW - cohort studies KW - diet KW - food and nutrition KW - urolithiasis KW - vitamin D SP - 405 EP - 410 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 197 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Kidney stones are a common and painful condition. Longitudinal prospective studies on the association between the intake of vitamin D and the risk of incident kidney stones are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a prospective analysis of 193,551 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study I and II. Participants were divided into categories of total (less than 100, 100 to 199, 200 to 399, 400 to 599, 600 to 999, 1,000 IU per day or greater) and supplemental (none, less than 400, 400 to 599, 600 to 999, 1,000 IU per day or greater) vitamin D intake. During a followup of 3,316,846 person-years there were 6,576 incident kidney stone events. Cox proportional hazards regression models were adjusted for age, body mass index, comorbidities, use of medications and intake of other nutrients. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment there was no statistically significant association between vitamin D intake and risk of stones in the HPFS (HR for 1,000 or greater vs less than 100 IU per day 1.08, 95% CI 0.80, 1.47, p for trend = 0.92) and the NHS I (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.73, 1.35, p for trend = 0.70), whereas there was a suggestion of a higher risk in the NHS II (HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.94, 1.48, p for trend = 0.02). Similar results were found for supplemental vitamin D intake. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D intake in typical amounts was not statistically associated with risk of kidney stone formation, although higher risk with higher doses than those studied here cannot be excluded. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27545576/Vitamin_D_Intake_and_the_Risk_of_Incident_Kidney_Stones_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.juro.2016.08.084?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -