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Change in blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and posttraumatic stress symptom: A secondary analysis of data from a placebo-controlled trial of omega3 supplements.
J Affect Disord. 2016 Nov 15; 205:289-291.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is suggested to be protective against posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from two observational studies. We previously conducted a randomized controlled trial and found no effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for prevention of PTSD. This secondary analysis aimed to determine whether change in blood levels of EPA is associated with PTSD symptoms.

METHODS

The percentages of EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) were measured in erythrocyte membranes at baseline and posttreatment in 110 participants with severe physical injury who were randomly assigned to receive either a daily dose of 1,470mg DHA and 147mg EPA or of placebo for 12 weeks. Associations between change in erythrocyte fatty acid levels during the trial controlling for each baseline level and PTSD severity at 12 weeks were analyzed by treatment arm.

RESULTS

In the omega3 supplements arm, changes in EPA+DHA (p=.023) and EPA (p=.001) as well as the EPA:AA ratio (p=.000) and EPA: DHA ratio (p=.013) were inversely correlated with PTSD severity. Change in AA was positively correlated with PTSD severity (p=.001).

LIMITATION

This trial was conducted at a single-center in Japan and PTSD symptoms in most participants were not serious.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased erythrocyte level of EPA during the trial was associated with low severity of PTSD symptoms in patients receiving omega3 supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Care Research, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center Japan, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan; Department of Psychiatry, National Disaster Medical Center, 3256 Midoricho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-0014, Japan. Electronic address: yumatsuo@ncc.go.jp.Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama, Toyama 930-0194, Japan.Department of Psychiatry, National Disaster Medical Center, 3256 Midoricho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-0014, Japan; Department of Mental Health Policy and Evaluation, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawahigashi-cho, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8553, Japan.Department of Medicine, Toyama Jonan Onsen Daini Hospital, 1-13-6 Taromarunishimachi, Toyama, Toyama 939-8271, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Letter
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27552592

Citation

Matsuoka, Yutaka J., et al. "Change in Blood Levels of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom: a Secondary Analysis of Data From a Placebo-controlled Trial of Omega3 Supplements." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 205, 2016, pp. 289-291.
Matsuoka YJ, Hamazaki K, Nishi D, et al. Change in blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and posttraumatic stress symptom: A secondary analysis of data from a placebo-controlled trial of omega3 supplements. J Affect Disord. 2016;205:289-291.
Matsuoka, Y. J., Hamazaki, K., Nishi, D., & Hamazaki, T. (2016). Change in blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and posttraumatic stress symptom: A secondary analysis of data from a placebo-controlled trial of omega3 supplements. Journal of Affective Disorders, 205, 289-291. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.005
Matsuoka YJ, et al. Change in Blood Levels of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom: a Secondary Analysis of Data From a Placebo-controlled Trial of Omega3 Supplements. J Affect Disord. 2016 Nov 15;205:289-291. PubMed PMID: 27552592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Change in blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and posttraumatic stress symptom: A secondary analysis of data from a placebo-controlled trial of omega3 supplements. AU - Matsuoka,Yutaka J, AU - Hamazaki,Kei, AU - Nishi,Daisuke, AU - Hamazaki,Tomohito, Y1 - 2016/08/13/ PY - 2016/06/14/received PY - 2016/07/06/revised PY - 2016/08/10/accepted PY - 2016/8/24/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2016/8/24/entrez KW - Clinical trial KW - Eicosapentaenoic acid KW - Omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acid KW - PTSD symptom SP - 289 EP - 291 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 205 N2 - BACKGROUND: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is suggested to be protective against posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from two observational studies. We previously conducted a randomized controlled trial and found no effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for prevention of PTSD. This secondary analysis aimed to determine whether change in blood levels of EPA is associated with PTSD symptoms. METHODS: The percentages of EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) were measured in erythrocyte membranes at baseline and posttreatment in 110 participants with severe physical injury who were randomly assigned to receive either a daily dose of 1,470mg DHA and 147mg EPA or of placebo for 12 weeks. Associations between change in erythrocyte fatty acid levels during the trial controlling for each baseline level and PTSD severity at 12 weeks were analyzed by treatment arm. RESULTS: In the omega3 supplements arm, changes in EPA+DHA (p=.023) and EPA (p=.001) as well as the EPA:AA ratio (p=.000) and EPA: DHA ratio (p=.013) were inversely correlated with PTSD severity. Change in AA was positively correlated with PTSD severity (p=.001). LIMITATION: This trial was conducted at a single-center in Japan and PTSD symptoms in most participants were not serious. CONCLUSIONS: Increased erythrocyte level of EPA during the trial was associated with low severity of PTSD symptoms in patients receiving omega3 supplements. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27552592/Change_in_blood_levels_of_eicosapentaenoic_acid_and_posttraumatic_stress_symptom:_A_secondary_analysis_of_data_from_a_placebo_controlled_trial_of_omega3_supplements_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(16)30995-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -