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Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors with Disability in People with Multiple Sclerosis: An International Cross-Sectional Study.
PLoS One 2016; 11(8):e0161701Plos

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Emerging evidence links modifiable lifestyle risk factors to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought further evidence around this hypothesis through detailed analysis of the association with disability of lifestyle behaviours of a large international sample of people with MS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A total of 2469 people with MS from 57 countries provided self-reported data via cross-sectional online survey on lifestyle (mostly with validated tools) and the primary outcome measure, disability (Patient Determined Disease Steps), categorised from 8 steps into 3 categories, mild, moderate and major disability. Multinomial logistic regression modelling derived relative risk ratios (RRRs) for disability categories.

RESULTS

RRRs of having moderate vs mild disability were: diet (per 30 points on 100 point scale) 0.72 (95%CI 0.52-0.98), ever smoking 1.32 (1.06-1.65), exercise (moderate/high vs low) 0.35 (0.28-0.44), latitude (per degree from the equator) 1.02 (1.01-1.04), and number of comorbidities (2 vs none) 1.43 (1.04-1.95), (3 vs none) 1.56 (1.13-2.16). RRRs of having major vs mild disability were: exercise (moderate/high vs low) 0.07 (0.04-0.11), alcohol consumption (moderate vs low) 0.45 (0.30-0.68), plant-based omega 3 supplementation 0.39 (0.18-0.86), and disease-modifying medication use 0.45 (0.29-0.70).

CONCLUSIONS

Healthier lifestyle has strong associations with disability in our large international sample of people with MS, supporting further investigation into the role of lifestyle risk factors in MS disease progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27560626

Citation

Jelinek, George A., et al. "Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors With Disability in People With Multiple Sclerosis: an International Cross-Sectional Study." PloS One, vol. 11, no. 8, 2016, pp. e0161701.
Jelinek GA, De Livera AM, Marck CH, et al. Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors with Disability in People with Multiple Sclerosis: An International Cross-Sectional Study. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(8):e0161701.
Jelinek, G. A., De Livera, A. M., Marck, C. H., Brown, C. R., Neate, S. L., Taylor, K. L., & Weiland, T. J. (2016). Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors with Disability in People with Multiple Sclerosis: An International Cross-Sectional Study. PloS One, 11(8), pp. e0161701. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161701.
Jelinek GA, et al. Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors With Disability in People With Multiple Sclerosis: an International Cross-Sectional Study. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(8):e0161701. PubMed PMID: 27560626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of Lifestyle, Medication, and Socio-Demographic Factors with Disability in People with Multiple Sclerosis: An International Cross-Sectional Study. AU - Jelinek,George A, AU - De Livera,Alysha M, AU - Marck,Claudia H, AU - Brown,Chelsea R, AU - Neate,Sandra L, AU - Taylor,Keryn L, AU - Weiland,Tracey J, Y1 - 2016/08/25/ PY - 2016/06/15/received PY - 2016/08/10/accepted PY - 2016/8/26/entrez PY - 2016/8/26/pubmed PY - 2017/7/27/medline SP - e0161701 EP - e0161701 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Emerging evidence links modifiable lifestyle risk factors to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought further evidence around this hypothesis through detailed analysis of the association with disability of lifestyle behaviours of a large international sample of people with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 2469 people with MS from 57 countries provided self-reported data via cross-sectional online survey on lifestyle (mostly with validated tools) and the primary outcome measure, disability (Patient Determined Disease Steps), categorised from 8 steps into 3 categories, mild, moderate and major disability. Multinomial logistic regression modelling derived relative risk ratios (RRRs) for disability categories. RESULTS: RRRs of having moderate vs mild disability were: diet (per 30 points on 100 point scale) 0.72 (95%CI 0.52-0.98), ever smoking 1.32 (1.06-1.65), exercise (moderate/high vs low) 0.35 (0.28-0.44), latitude (per degree from the equator) 1.02 (1.01-1.04), and number of comorbidities (2 vs none) 1.43 (1.04-1.95), (3 vs none) 1.56 (1.13-2.16). RRRs of having major vs mild disability were: exercise (moderate/high vs low) 0.07 (0.04-0.11), alcohol consumption (moderate vs low) 0.45 (0.30-0.68), plant-based omega 3 supplementation 0.39 (0.18-0.86), and disease-modifying medication use 0.45 (0.29-0.70). CONCLUSIONS: Healthier lifestyle has strong associations with disability in our large international sample of people with MS, supporting further investigation into the role of lifestyle risk factors in MS disease progression. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27560626/Associations_of_Lifestyle_Medication_and_Socio_Demographic_Factors_with_Disability_in_People_with_Multiple_Sclerosis:_An_International_Cross_Sectional_Study_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161701 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -