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Association between bone mineral density and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Korean adults.
J Endocrinol Invest. 2016 Nov; 39(11):1329-1336.JE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with various metabolic abnormalities that can increase the risk of an osteoporotic fracture. Across the few previous studies of the association between NAFLD and bone mineral density (BMD), the association was not consistent. We examined the association between BMD and NAFLD in generally healthy adults.

METHODS

The subjects who visited the Seoul National University Hospital for health checkup between 2005 and 2015 were included. Men aged more than 40 and postmenopausal women were included. Lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN) BMD were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Liver ultrasonography was conducted to evaluate the extent of fatty changes. After excluding subjects with a secondary cause of liver disease such as heavy drinking or viral hepatitis, multivariable linear regression analysis adjusted for possible cofactors was performed to investigate the association between BMD and NAFLD.

RESULTS

A total of 6634 subjects was included in this study (men:women = 3306:3328). Multivariate regression analysis revealed a significant negative association between FN BMD and NAFLD in men (β = -0.013, p = 0.029). However, there was a positive correlation between lumbar spine BMD and NAFLD in postmenopausal women (β = 0.022, p = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS

Moderate or severe NAFLD exerted a detrimental effect on FN BMD in men. However, moderate or severe NAFLD had a positive effect on lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal women. Potential sex-specific differences of the effect of NAFLD on BMD need to be elucidated further.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea.Department of Family Medicine, Center for Health Promotion and Optimal Aging, Health Promotion Center for Cancer survivor, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Republic of Korea. belong.cho@gmail.com. Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270, Republic of Korea. belong.cho@gmail.com. Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 71 Ihwajang-Gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-810, Republic of Korea. belong.cho@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27561910

Citation

Lee, S H., et al. "Association Between Bone Mineral Density and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Korean Adults." Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, vol. 39, no. 11, 2016, pp. 1329-1336.
Lee SH, Yun JM, Kim SH, et al. Association between bone mineral density and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Korean adults. J Endocrinol Invest. 2016;39(11):1329-1336.
Lee, S. H., Yun, J. M., Kim, S. H., Seo, Y. G., Min, H., Chung, E., Bae, Y. S., Ryou, I. S., & Cho, B. (2016). Association between bone mineral density and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Korean adults. Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, 39(11), 1329-1336.
Lee SH, et al. Association Between Bone Mineral Density and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Korean Adults. J Endocrinol Invest. 2016;39(11):1329-1336. PubMed PMID: 27561910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between bone mineral density and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Korean adults. AU - Lee,S H, AU - Yun,J M, AU - Kim,S H, AU - Seo,Y G, AU - Min,H, AU - Chung,E, AU - Bae,Y S, AU - Ryou,I S, AU - Cho,B, Y1 - 2016/08/25/ PY - 2016/04/02/received PY - 2016/08/01/accepted PY - 2016/10/21/pubmed PY - 2017/4/21/medline PY - 2016/8/27/entrez KW - Bone mineral density KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease KW - Osteoporosis SP - 1329 EP - 1336 JF - Journal of endocrinological investigation JO - J Endocrinol Invest VL - 39 IS - 11 N2 - PURPOSE: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with various metabolic abnormalities that can increase the risk of an osteoporotic fracture. Across the few previous studies of the association between NAFLD and bone mineral density (BMD), the association was not consistent. We examined the association between BMD and NAFLD in generally healthy adults. METHODS: The subjects who visited the Seoul National University Hospital for health checkup between 2005 and 2015 were included. Men aged more than 40 and postmenopausal women were included. Lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN) BMD were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Liver ultrasonography was conducted to evaluate the extent of fatty changes. After excluding subjects with a secondary cause of liver disease such as heavy drinking or viral hepatitis, multivariable linear regression analysis adjusted for possible cofactors was performed to investigate the association between BMD and NAFLD. RESULTS: A total of 6634 subjects was included in this study (men:women = 3306:3328). Multivariate regression analysis revealed a significant negative association between FN BMD and NAFLD in men (β = -0.013, p = 0.029). However, there was a positive correlation between lumbar spine BMD and NAFLD in postmenopausal women (β = 0.022, p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate or severe NAFLD exerted a detrimental effect on FN BMD in men. However, moderate or severe NAFLD had a positive effect on lumbar spine BMD in postmenopausal women. Potential sex-specific differences of the effect of NAFLD on BMD need to be elucidated further. SN - 1720-8386 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27561910/Association_between_bone_mineral_density_and_nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_in_Korean_adults_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40618-016-0528-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -