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Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity.

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a major global issue. Its incidence is constantly increasing, thereby offering a threatening public health perspective. The risk of developing the numerous chronic diseases associated with this condition from very early in life is significant. Although complex and multi-factorial, the pathophysiology of obesity recognizes essential roles of nutritional and metabolic aspects. Particularly, several risk factors identified as possible determinants of later-life obesity act within the first 1000 days of life (i.e., from conception to age 2 years). The purpose of this manuscript is to review those key mechanisms for which a role in predisposing children to obesity is supported by the most recent literature. Throughout the development of the human feeding environment, three different stages have been identified: (1) the prenatal period; (2) breast vs. formula feeding; and (3) complementary diet. A deep understanding of the specific nutritional challenges presented within each phase might foster the development of future preventive strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. chiara.mameli@unimi.it.Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. saramazzantini@hotmail.it.Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. gianvincenzo.zuccotti@unimi.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27563917

Citation

Mameli, Chiara, et al. "Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: the Origin of Childhood Obesity." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 13, no. 9, 2016.
Mameli C, Mazzantini S, Zuccotti GV. Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016;13(9).
Mameli, C., Mazzantini, S., & Zuccotti, G. V. (2016). Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(9), doi:10.3390/ijerph13090838.
Mameli C, Mazzantini S, Zuccotti GV. Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: the Origin of Childhood Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 08 23;13(9) PubMed PMID: 27563917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. AU - Mameli,Chiara, AU - Mazzantini,Sara, AU - Zuccotti,Gian Vincenzo, Y1 - 2016/08/23/ PY - 2016/07/08/received PY - 2016/08/12/revised PY - 2016/08/18/accepted PY - 2016/8/27/entrez PY - 2016/8/27/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline KW - breast feeding KW - child nutrition KW - diet KW - obesity KW - overweight JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 13 IS - 9 N2 - Childhood obesity is a major global issue. Its incidence is constantly increasing, thereby offering a threatening public health perspective. The risk of developing the numerous chronic diseases associated with this condition from very early in life is significant. Although complex and multi-factorial, the pathophysiology of obesity recognizes essential roles of nutritional and metabolic aspects. Particularly, several risk factors identified as possible determinants of later-life obesity act within the first 1000 days of life (i.e., from conception to age 2 years). The purpose of this manuscript is to review those key mechanisms for which a role in predisposing children to obesity is supported by the most recent literature. Throughout the development of the human feeding environment, three different stages have been identified: (1) the prenatal period; (2) breast vs. formula feeding; and (3) complementary diet. A deep understanding of the specific nutritional challenges presented within each phase might foster the development of future preventive strategies. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27563917/full_citation L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph13090838 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -