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Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity.

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a major global issue. Its incidence is constantly increasing, thereby offering a threatening public health perspective. The risk of developing the numerous chronic diseases associated with this condition from very early in life is significant. Although complex and multi-factorial, the pathophysiology of obesity recognizes essential roles of nutritional and metabolic aspects. Particularly, several risk factors identified as possible determinants of later-life obesity act within the first 1000 days of life (i.e., from conception to age 2 years). The purpose of this manuscript is to review those key mechanisms for which a role in predisposing children to obesity is supported by the most recent literature. Throughout the development of the human feeding environment, three different stages have been identified: (1) the prenatal period; (2) breast vs. formula feeding; and (3) complementary diet. A deep understanding of the specific nutritional challenges presented within each phase might foster the development of future preventive strategies.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. chiara.mameli@unimi.it.

    ,

    Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. saramazzantini@hotmail.it.

    Department of Pediatrics, V. Buzzi Hospital, University of Milan, Milan 20154, Italy. gianvincenzo.zuccotti@unimi.it.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Breast Feeding
    Child
    Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Child, Preschool
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Infant, Newborn
    Male
    Nutritional Status
    Pediatric Obesity
    Pregnancy
    Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27563917

    Citation

    Mameli, Chiara, et al. "Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: the Origin of Childhood Obesity." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 13, no. 9, 2016.
    Mameli C, Mazzantini S, Zuccotti GV. Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016;13(9).
    Mameli, C., Mazzantini, S., & Zuccotti, G. V. (2016). Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(9), doi:10.3390/ijerph13090838.
    Mameli C, Mazzantini S, Zuccotti GV. Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: the Origin of Childhood Obesity. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 08 23;13(9) PubMed PMID: 27563917.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition in the First 1000 Days: The Origin of Childhood Obesity. AU - Mameli,Chiara, AU - Mazzantini,Sara, AU - Zuccotti,Gian Vincenzo, Y1 - 2016/08/23/ PY - 2016/07/08/received PY - 2016/08/12/revised PY - 2016/08/18/accepted PY - 2016/8/27/entrez PY - 2016/8/27/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline KW - breast feeding KW - child nutrition KW - diet KW - obesity KW - overweight JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 13 IS - 9 N2 - Childhood obesity is a major global issue. Its incidence is constantly increasing, thereby offering a threatening public health perspective. The risk of developing the numerous chronic diseases associated with this condition from very early in life is significant. Although complex and multi-factorial, the pathophysiology of obesity recognizes essential roles of nutritional and metabolic aspects. Particularly, several risk factors identified as possible determinants of later-life obesity act within the first 1000 days of life (i.e., from conception to age 2 years). The purpose of this manuscript is to review those key mechanisms for which a role in predisposing children to obesity is supported by the most recent literature. Throughout the development of the human feeding environment, three different stages have been identified: (1) the prenatal period; (2) breast vs. formula feeding; and (3) complementary diet. A deep understanding of the specific nutritional challenges presented within each phase might foster the development of future preventive strategies. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27563917/full_citation L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph13090838 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -