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Child pneumonia - focus on the Western Pacific Region.
Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017 Jan; 21:102-110.PR

Abstract

Worldwide, pneumonia is the leading cause of death in infants and young children (aged <5 years). We provide an overview of the global pneumonia disease burden, as well as the aetiology and management practices in different parts of the world, with a specific focus on the WHO Western Pacific Region. In 2011, the Western Pacific region had an estimated 0.11 pneumonia episodes per child-year with 61,900 pneumonia-related deaths in children less than 5 years of age. The majority (>75%) of pneumonia deaths occurred in six countries; Cambodia, China, Laos, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Viet Nam. Historically Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were the commonest causes of severe pneumonia and pneumonia-related deaths in young children, but this is changing with the introduction of highly effective conjugate vaccines and socio-economic development. The relative contribution of viruses and atypical bacteria appear to be increasing and traditional case management approaches may require revision to accommodate increased uptake of conjugated vaccines in the Western Pacific region. Careful consideration should be given to risk reduction strategies, enhanced vaccination coverage, improved management of hypoxaemia and antibiotic stewardship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, The University of Sydney, Australia; Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children, Da Nang, Viet Nam. Electronic address: thng5150@uni.sydney.edu.au.Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children, Da Nang, Viet Nam.Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia; Sydney Medical School Northern, The University of Sydney, Australia.Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Australia.Discipline of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, The University of Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27569107

Citation

Nguyen, T K P., et al. "Child Pneumonia - Focus On the Western Pacific Region." Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, vol. 21, 2017, pp. 102-110.
Nguyen TK, Tran TH, Roberts CL, et al. Child pneumonia - focus on the Western Pacific Region. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017;21:102-110.
Nguyen, T. K., Tran, T. H., Roberts, C. L., Graham, S. M., & Marais, B. J. (2017). Child pneumonia - focus on the Western Pacific Region. Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, 21, 102-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prrv.2016.07.004
Nguyen TK, et al. Child Pneumonia - Focus On the Western Pacific Region. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017;21:102-110. PubMed PMID: 27569107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Child pneumonia - focus on the Western Pacific Region. AU - Nguyen,T K P, AU - Tran,T H, AU - Roberts,C L, AU - Graham,S M, AU - Marais,B J, Y1 - 2016/07/18/ PY - 2016/07/12/received PY - 2016/07/12/accepted PY - 2016/8/30/pubmed PY - 2017/9/22/medline PY - 2016/8/30/entrez KW - Child KW - acute respiratory infection KW - aetiology KW - antibiotic stewardship KW - epidemiology KW - management KW - pneumonia KW - vaccination SP - 102 EP - 110 JF - Paediatric respiratory reviews JO - Paediatr Respir Rev VL - 21 N2 - Worldwide, pneumonia is the leading cause of death in infants and young children (aged <5 years). We provide an overview of the global pneumonia disease burden, as well as the aetiology and management practices in different parts of the world, with a specific focus on the WHO Western Pacific Region. In 2011, the Western Pacific region had an estimated 0.11 pneumonia episodes per child-year with 61,900 pneumonia-related deaths in children less than 5 years of age. The majority (>75%) of pneumonia deaths occurred in six countries; Cambodia, China, Laos, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Viet Nam. Historically Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were the commonest causes of severe pneumonia and pneumonia-related deaths in young children, but this is changing with the introduction of highly effective conjugate vaccines and socio-economic development. The relative contribution of viruses and atypical bacteria appear to be increasing and traditional case management approaches may require revision to accommodate increased uptake of conjugated vaccines in the Western Pacific region. Careful consideration should be given to risk reduction strategies, enhanced vaccination coverage, improved management of hypoxaemia and antibiotic stewardship. SN - 1526-0550 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27569107/Child_pneumonia___focus_on_the_Western_Pacific_Region_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1526-0542(16)30064-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -