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Influence of domestic processing on the bioaccessibility of selenium from selected food grains and composite meals.

Abstract

Selenium, an ultra trace element with several health beneficial attributes, should be mainly derived from dietary sources. Since food processing is likely to alter the bioavailability of micronutrients, the influence of such processing such as germination and fermentation on selenium content and bioaccessibility, information on which is lacking, was examined in this study. Bioaccessibility of selenium from four cereal-based composite meals was also studied. Chickpea, green gram and finger millet were employed to study the effect of germination, and for effect of fermentation, batters used in preparation dosa, idli and dhokla were used. Soaking the grains in water as a part of germination and fermentation brought about a decrease in selenium content, while its bioaccessibility was not affected. The information on the loss of selenium during soaking and heat processing of the germinated grains is novel. Fermentation resulted in a further decrease in selenium content, the percent decrease ranging from 26 to 47 in the batters. Similar decreases were seen in the bioaccessible selenium content as a result of soaking and fermentation. Cooking of the fermented batters, however, significantly enhanced the bioaccessibility of selenium from dosa and dhokla by 44 and 71 %, respectively. Selenium content of the four meals ranged from 150 to 228.8 ng/g. Bioaccessible selenium was highest in the finger millet-based meal (32.8 ng/g), followed by sorghum, wheat and rice-based meals. The present investigation thus provides vital and novel information on selenium content and bioaccessibility from foods subjected to processing as is commonly practiced in Indian households.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry & Nutrition, CSIR - Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India.

    Department of Biochemistry & Nutrition, CSIR - Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27570288

    Citation

    Khanam, Anjum, and Kalpana Platel. "Influence of Domestic Processing On the Bioaccessibility of Selenium From Selected Food Grains and Composite Meals." Journal of Food Science and Technology, vol. 53, no. 3, 2016, pp. 1634-9.
    Khanam A, Platel K. Influence of domestic processing on the bioaccessibility of selenium from selected food grains and composite meals. J Food Sci Technol. 2016;53(3):1634-9.
    Khanam, A., & Platel, K. (2016). Influence of domestic processing on the bioaccessibility of selenium from selected food grains and composite meals. Journal of Food Science and Technology, 53(3), pp. 1634-9. doi:10.1007/s13197-015-2075-x.
    Khanam A, Platel K. Influence of Domestic Processing On the Bioaccessibility of Selenium From Selected Food Grains and Composite Meals. J Food Sci Technol. 2016;53(3):1634-9. PubMed PMID: 27570288.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of domestic processing on the bioaccessibility of selenium from selected food grains and composite meals. AU - Khanam,Anjum, AU - Platel,Kalpana, Y1 - 2015/10/31/ PY - 2015/09/30/revised PY - 2015/10/22/accepted PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2016/8/30/entrez PY - 2016/8/30/pubmed PY - 2016/8/30/medline KW - Bioaccessibility,·Germination KW - Fermentation KW - RDA KW - Selenium KW - composite meal SP - 1634 EP - 9 JF - Journal of food science and technology JO - J Food Sci Technol VL - 53 IS - 3 N2 - Selenium, an ultra trace element with several health beneficial attributes, should be mainly derived from dietary sources. Since food processing is likely to alter the bioavailability of micronutrients, the influence of such processing such as germination and fermentation on selenium content and bioaccessibility, information on which is lacking, was examined in this study. Bioaccessibility of selenium from four cereal-based composite meals was also studied. Chickpea, green gram and finger millet were employed to study the effect of germination, and for effect of fermentation, batters used in preparation dosa, idli and dhokla were used. Soaking the grains in water as a part of germination and fermentation brought about a decrease in selenium content, while its bioaccessibility was not affected. The information on the loss of selenium during soaking and heat processing of the germinated grains is novel. Fermentation resulted in a further decrease in selenium content, the percent decrease ranging from 26 to 47 in the batters. Similar decreases were seen in the bioaccessible selenium content as a result of soaking and fermentation. Cooking of the fermented batters, however, significantly enhanced the bioaccessibility of selenium from dosa and dhokla by 44 and 71 %, respectively. Selenium content of the four meals ranged from 150 to 228.8 ng/g. Bioaccessible selenium was highest in the finger millet-based meal (32.8 ng/g), followed by sorghum, wheat and rice-based meals. The present investigation thus provides vital and novel information on selenium content and bioaccessibility from foods subjected to processing as is commonly practiced in Indian households. SN - 0022-1155 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27570288/Influence_of_domestic_processing_on_the_bioaccessibility_of_selenium_from_selected_food_grains_and_composite_meals_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/27570288/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -