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Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov; 101(11):3922-3937.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes.

PARTICIPANTS

The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline.

EVIDENCE

The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies.

CONSENSUS PROCESS

One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines.

CONCLUSIONS

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Children's Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Practice Guideline

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27588440

Citation

Peters, Anne L., et al. "Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 101, no. 11, 2016, pp. 3922-3937.
Peters AL, Ahmann AJ, Battelino T, et al. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016;101(11):3922-3937.
Peters, A. L., Ahmann, A. J., Battelino, T., Evert, A., Hirsch, I. B., Murad, M. H., Winter, W. E., & Wolpert, H. (2016). Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 101(11), 3922-3937.
Peters AL, et al. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016;101(11):3922-3937. PubMed PMID: 27588440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. AU - Peters,Anne L, AU - Ahmann,Andrew J, AU - Battelino,Tadej, AU - Evert,Alison, AU - Hirsch,Irl B, AU - Murad,M Hassan, AU - Winter,William E, AU - Wolpert,Howard, Y1 - 2016/09/02/ PY - 2016/11/5/pubmed PY - 2017/6/3/medline PY - 2016/9/3/entrez SP - 3922 EP - 3937 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J Clin Endocrinol Metab VL - 101 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes. PARTICIPANTS: The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. EVIDENCE: The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. CONSENSUS PROCESS: One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use. SN - 1945-7197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27588440/Diabetes_Technology_Continuous_Subcutaneous_Insulin_Infusion_Therapy_and_Continuous_Glucose_Monitoring_in_Adults:_An_Endocrine_Society_Clinical_Practice_Guideline_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2016-2534 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -