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Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: A 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study.
J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 10 18; 54(4):1473-1482.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are non-demented, but demonstrate cognitive dysfunction, and have significantly higher risk of progressing to dementia. A better understanding of more sensitive risk factors, such as combination of cognitive and psychological status, for progression of MCI to dementia may be crucial for prevention of development of dementia.

OBJECTIVE

To examine MCI, depressive symptoms, and comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms as risk factors for development of dementia.

METHODS

A total of 3,663 community-dwelling older people were included in this prospective longitudinal study. MCI was determined by age- and education-adjusted objective cognitive impairment using computerized comprehensive cognitive measures including memory, attention/executive function, and processing speed. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and defined by a GDS score of 6 or more.

RESULTS

During the 24-month follow-up period, 72 participants (2.0%) developed dementia. Baseline MCI was significantly associated with an increased risk of incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-5.5) but depressive symptoms were not (2.0; 1.0-4.2) after adjusting for age, sex, education, prescribed medications, and walking speed. Participants with comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms at baseline had a higher risk of developing dementia (HR, 4.8; 2.3-10.5).

CONCLUSION

Although MCI and depressive symptoms may be associated with increased risk for incident dementia independently, comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms have a significantly greater impact on dementia development among community-dwelling older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Department of Preventive Gerontology, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan.Research Institute of Aging and Development, J.F. Oberlin University, Tokyo, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27589518

Citation

Makizako, Hyuma, et al. "Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: a 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 54, no. 4, 2016, pp. 1473-1482.
Makizako H, Shimada H, Doi T, et al. Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: A 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;54(4):1473-1482.
Makizako, H., Shimada, H., Doi, T., Tsutsumimoto, K., Hotta, R., Nakakubo, S., Makino, K., & Suzuki, T. (2016). Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: A 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 54(4), 1473-1482.
Makizako H, et al. Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: a 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 10 18;54(4):1473-1482. PubMed PMID: 27589518.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: A 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study. AU - Makizako,Hyuma, AU - Shimada,Hiroyuki, AU - Doi,Takehiko, AU - Tsutsumimoto,Kota, AU - Hotta,Ryo, AU - Nakakubo,Sho, AU - Makino,Keitaro, AU - Suzuki,Takao, PY - 2016/10/22/pubmed PY - 2018/1/25/medline PY - 2016/9/3/entrez KW - Comorbidity KW - dementia KW - depressive symptoms KW - mild cognitive impairment SP - 1473 EP - 1482 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are non-demented, but demonstrate cognitive dysfunction, and have significantly higher risk of progressing to dementia. A better understanding of more sensitive risk factors, such as combination of cognitive and psychological status, for progression of MCI to dementia may be crucial for prevention of development of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To examine MCI, depressive symptoms, and comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms as risk factors for development of dementia. METHODS: A total of 3,663 community-dwelling older people were included in this prospective longitudinal study. MCI was determined by age- and education-adjusted objective cognitive impairment using computerized comprehensive cognitive measures including memory, attention/executive function, and processing speed. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and defined by a GDS score of 6 or more. RESULTS: During the 24-month follow-up period, 72 participants (2.0%) developed dementia. Baseline MCI was significantly associated with an increased risk of incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-5.5) but depressive symptoms were not (2.0; 1.0-4.2) after adjusting for age, sex, education, prescribed medications, and walking speed. Participants with comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms at baseline had a higher risk of developing dementia (HR, 4.8; 2.3-10.5). CONCLUSION: Although MCI and depressive symptoms may be associated with increased risk for incident dementia independently, comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms have a significantly greater impact on dementia development among community-dwelling older adults. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27589518/Comorbid_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_and_Depressive_Symptoms_Predict_Future_Dementia_in_Community_Older_Adults:_A_24_Month_Follow_Up_Longitudinal_Study_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-160244 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -