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Support for immigration reduction and physician distrust in the United States.
SAGE Open Med 2016; 4:2050312116652567SO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Health research indicates that physician trust in the United States has declined over the last 50 years. Paralleling this trend is a decline in social capital, with researchers finding a negative relationship between immigration-based diversity and social capital. This article examines whether physician distrust is also tied to immigration-based diversity and declining social capital.

METHODS

Data come from the 2012 General Social Survey, one of the gold standards of US public opinion surveys, using a national probability sample of 1080 adult US respondents. Key measures included support for reducing levels of immigration to the United States and multiple measures of physician trust.

RESULTS

The results of ordinary least squares regressions, using survey weights, indicate that support for reducing immigration is positively linked to physician distrust, bringing physician distrust into the orbit of research on diversity and declining social capital. Models controlled for age, education, income, gender, race, nativity, conservatism, unemployed status, lack of health insurance, and self-rated health. Furthermore, analyses of a subset of respondents reveal that measures of general trust and some forms of institutional trust do not explain away the association between support for immigration reduction and physician distrust, though confidence in science as an institution appears relevant.

CONCLUSION

Consistent with diversity and social capital research, this article finds that an immigration attitude predicts physician distrust. Physician distrust may not be linked just to physician-patient interactions, the structure of the health care system, or health policies, but could also be tied to declining social trust in general.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27621801

Citation

Samson, Frank L.. "Support for Immigration Reduction and Physician Distrust in the United States." SAGE Open Medicine, vol. 4, 2016, p. 2050312116652567.
Samson FL. Support for immigration reduction and physician distrust in the United States. SAGE Open Med. 2016;4:2050312116652567.
Samson, F. L. (2016). Support for immigration reduction and physician distrust in the United States. SAGE Open Medicine, 4, p. 2050312116652567. doi:10.1177/2050312116652567.
Samson FL. Support for Immigration Reduction and Physician Distrust in the United States. SAGE Open Med. 2016;4:2050312116652567. PubMed PMID: 27621801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Support for immigration reduction and physician distrust in the United States. A1 - Samson,Frank L, Y1 - 2016/06/21/ PY - 2015/12/21/received PY - 2016/05/04/accepted PY - 2016/9/14/entrez PY - 2016/9/14/pubmed PY - 2016/9/14/medline KW - Physician trust KW - diversity KW - health services KW - immigration SP - 2050312116652567 EP - 2050312116652567 JF - SAGE open medicine JO - SAGE Open Med VL - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Health research indicates that physician trust in the United States has declined over the last 50 years. Paralleling this trend is a decline in social capital, with researchers finding a negative relationship between immigration-based diversity and social capital. This article examines whether physician distrust is also tied to immigration-based diversity and declining social capital. METHODS: Data come from the 2012 General Social Survey, one of the gold standards of US public opinion surveys, using a national probability sample of 1080 adult US respondents. Key measures included support for reducing levels of immigration to the United States and multiple measures of physician trust. RESULTS: The results of ordinary least squares regressions, using survey weights, indicate that support for reducing immigration is positively linked to physician distrust, bringing physician distrust into the orbit of research on diversity and declining social capital. Models controlled for age, education, income, gender, race, nativity, conservatism, unemployed status, lack of health insurance, and self-rated health. Furthermore, analyses of a subset of respondents reveal that measures of general trust and some forms of institutional trust do not explain away the association between support for immigration reduction and physician distrust, though confidence in science as an institution appears relevant. CONCLUSION: Consistent with diversity and social capital research, this article finds that an immigration attitude predicts physician distrust. Physician distrust may not be linked just to physician-patient interactions, the structure of the health care system, or health policies, but could also be tied to declining social trust in general. SN - 2050-3121 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27621801/Support_for_immigration_reduction_and_physician_distrust_in_the_United_States_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2050312116652567?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -