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Maternal high fructose and low protein consumption during pregnancy and lactation share some but not all effects on early-life growth and metabolic programming of rat offspring.
Nutr Res 2016; 36(9):937-946NR

Abstract

Maternal nutritional stress during pregnancy acts to program offspring metabolism. We hypothesized that the nutritional stress caused by maternal fructose or low protein intake during pregnancy would program the offspring to develop metabolic aberrations that would be exacerbated by a diet rich in fructose or fat during adult life. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare the fetal programming effects of maternal fructose with the established programming model of a low-protein diet on offspring. Male offspring from Sprague-Dawley dams fed a 60% starch control diet, a 60% fructose diet, or a low-protein diet throughout pregnancy and lactation were weaned onto either a 60% starch control diet, 60% fructose diet, or a 30% fat diet for 15 weeks. Offspring from low-protein and fructose-fed dam showed retarded growth (P<.05) at weaning (50.3, 29.6 vs 59.1±0.8 g) and at 18 weeks of age (420, 369 vs 464±10.9 g). At 18 weeks of age, offspring from fructose dams expressed greater quantities (P<.05) of intestinal Pgc1a messenger RNA compared with offspring from control or low-protein dams (1.31 vs 0.89, 0.85; confidence interval, 0.78-1.04). Similarly, maternal fructose (P=.09) and low-protein (P<.05) consumption increased expression of Pgc1a in offspring liver (7.24, 2.22 vs 1.22; confidence interval, 2.11-3.45). These data indicate that maternal fructose feeding is a programming model that shares some features of maternal protein restriction such as retarded growth, but is unique in programming of selected hepatic and intestinal transcripts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Interdepartmental Nutrition Program, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.Interdepartmental Nutrition Program, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.Department of Animal Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA. Electronic address: sdonkin@purdue.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27632913

Citation

Arentson-Lantz, Emily J., et al. "Maternal High Fructose and Low Protein Consumption During Pregnancy and Lactation Share some but Not All Effects On Early-life Growth and Metabolic Programming of Rat Offspring." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 36, no. 9, 2016, pp. 937-946.
Arentson-Lantz EJ, Zou M, Teegarden D, et al. Maternal high fructose and low protein consumption during pregnancy and lactation share some but not all effects on early-life growth and metabolic programming of rat offspring. Nutr Res. 2016;36(9):937-946.
Arentson-Lantz, E. J., Zou, M., Teegarden, D., Buhman, K. K., & Donkin, S. S. (2016). Maternal high fructose and low protein consumption during pregnancy and lactation share some but not all effects on early-life growth and metabolic programming of rat offspring. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 36(9), pp. 937-946. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2016.06.014.
Arentson-Lantz EJ, et al. Maternal High Fructose and Low Protein Consumption During Pregnancy and Lactation Share some but Not All Effects On Early-life Growth and Metabolic Programming of Rat Offspring. Nutr Res. 2016;36(9):937-946. PubMed PMID: 27632913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal high fructose and low protein consumption during pregnancy and lactation share some but not all effects on early-life growth and metabolic programming of rat offspring. AU - Arentson-Lantz,Emily J, AU - Zou,Mi, AU - Teegarden,Dorothy, AU - Buhman,Kimberly K, AU - Donkin,Shawn S, Y1 - 2016/06/28/ PY - 2016/03/08/received PY - 2016/06/20/revised PY - 2016/06/23/accepted PY - 2016/9/17/entrez PY - 2016/9/17/pubmed PY - 2018/1/27/medline KW - Fetal programming KW - Fructose KW - Liver KW - Low protein KW - Rat SP - 937 EP - 946 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 36 IS - 9 N2 - Maternal nutritional stress during pregnancy acts to program offspring metabolism. We hypothesized that the nutritional stress caused by maternal fructose or low protein intake during pregnancy would program the offspring to develop metabolic aberrations that would be exacerbated by a diet rich in fructose or fat during adult life. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare the fetal programming effects of maternal fructose with the established programming model of a low-protein diet on offspring. Male offspring from Sprague-Dawley dams fed a 60% starch control diet, a 60% fructose diet, or a low-protein diet throughout pregnancy and lactation were weaned onto either a 60% starch control diet, 60% fructose diet, or a 30% fat diet for 15 weeks. Offspring from low-protein and fructose-fed dam showed retarded growth (P<.05) at weaning (50.3, 29.6 vs 59.1±0.8 g) and at 18 weeks of age (420, 369 vs 464±10.9 g). At 18 weeks of age, offspring from fructose dams expressed greater quantities (P<.05) of intestinal Pgc1a messenger RNA compared with offspring from control or low-protein dams (1.31 vs 0.89, 0.85; confidence interval, 0.78-1.04). Similarly, maternal fructose (P=.09) and low-protein (P<.05) consumption increased expression of Pgc1a in offspring liver (7.24, 2.22 vs 1.22; confidence interval, 2.11-3.45). These data indicate that maternal fructose feeding is a programming model that shares some features of maternal protein restriction such as retarded growth, but is unique in programming of selected hepatic and intestinal transcripts. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27632913/Maternal_high_fructose_and_low_protein_consumption_during_pregnancy_and_lactation_share_some_but_not_all_effects_on_early_life_growth_and_metabolic_programming_of_rat_offspring_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(16)30147-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -