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Cigarette smoking and electronic cigarette vaping patterns as a function of e-cigarette flavourings.
Tob Control. 2016 11; 25(Suppl 2):ii67-ii72.TC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The present study examined the influence of flavouring on the smoking and vaping behaviour of cigarette smokers asked to adopt e-cigarettes for a period of 6 weeks.

METHODS

Participants were 88 current male and female smokers with no intention to stop smoking, but who agreed to substitute e-cigarettes for their current cigarettes. On intake, participants were administered tests of taste and smell for e-cigarettes flavoured with tobacco, menthol, cherry and chocolate, and were given a refillable e-cigarette of their preferred flavour or a control flavour. Participants completed daily logs of cigarette and e-cigarette use and were followed each week.

RESULTS

Analyses over days indicated that, during the 6-week e-cigarette period, cigarette smoking rates dropped from an average of about 16 to about 7 cigarettes/day. e-Cigarette flavour had a significant effect such that the largest drop in cigarette smoking occurred among those assigned menthol e-cigarettes, and the smallest drop in smoking occurred among those assigned chocolate and cherry flavours. e-Cigarette vaping rates also differed significantly by flavour assigned, with the highest vaping rates for tobacco- and cherry-flavoured e-cigarettes, and the lowest rates for those assigned to chocolate.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings suggest that adoption of e-cigarettes in smokers may influence smoking rates and that e-cigarette flavourings can moderate this effect. e-Cigarette vaping rates are also influenced by flavourings. These findings may have implications for the utility of e-cigarettes as a nicotine replacement device and for the regulation of flavourings in e-cigarettes for harm reduction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut, USA.University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27633766

Citation

Litt, Mark D., et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Electronic Cigarette Vaping Patterns as a Function of E-cigarette Flavourings." Tobacco Control, vol. 25, no. Suppl 2, 2016, pp. ii67-ii72.
Litt MD, Duffy V, Oncken C. Cigarette smoking and electronic cigarette vaping patterns as a function of e-cigarette flavourings. Tob Control. 2016;25(Suppl 2):ii67-ii72.
Litt, M. D., Duffy, V., & Oncken, C. (2016). Cigarette smoking and electronic cigarette vaping patterns as a function of e-cigarette flavourings. Tobacco Control, 25(Suppl 2), ii67-ii72. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053223
Litt MD, Duffy V, Oncken C. Cigarette Smoking and Electronic Cigarette Vaping Patterns as a Function of E-cigarette Flavourings. Tob Control. 2016;25(Suppl 2):ii67-ii72. PubMed PMID: 27633766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and electronic cigarette vaping patterns as a function of e-cigarette flavourings. AU - Litt,Mark D, AU - Duffy,Valerie, AU - Oncken,Cheryl, Y1 - 2016/09/15/ PY - 2016/06/02/received PY - 2016/08/04/revised PY - 2016/08/12/accepted PY - 2016/9/17/pubmed PY - 2018/2/7/medline PY - 2016/9/17/entrez KW - Addiction KW - Harm Reduction KW - Non-cigarette tobacco products SP - ii67 EP - ii72 JF - Tobacco control JO - Tob Control VL - 25 IS - Suppl 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The present study examined the influence of flavouring on the smoking and vaping behaviour of cigarette smokers asked to adopt e-cigarettes for a period of 6 weeks. METHODS: Participants were 88 current male and female smokers with no intention to stop smoking, but who agreed to substitute e-cigarettes for their current cigarettes. On intake, participants were administered tests of taste and smell for e-cigarettes flavoured with tobacco, menthol, cherry and chocolate, and were given a refillable e-cigarette of their preferred flavour or a control flavour. Participants completed daily logs of cigarette and e-cigarette use and were followed each week. RESULTS: Analyses over days indicated that, during the 6-week e-cigarette period, cigarette smoking rates dropped from an average of about 16 to about 7 cigarettes/day. e-Cigarette flavour had a significant effect such that the largest drop in cigarette smoking occurred among those assigned menthol e-cigarettes, and the smallest drop in smoking occurred among those assigned chocolate and cherry flavours. e-Cigarette vaping rates also differed significantly by flavour assigned, with the highest vaping rates for tobacco- and cherry-flavoured e-cigarettes, and the lowest rates for those assigned to chocolate. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that adoption of e-cigarettes in smokers may influence smoking rates and that e-cigarette flavourings can moderate this effect. e-Cigarette vaping rates are also influenced by flavourings. These findings may have implications for the utility of e-cigarettes as a nicotine replacement device and for the regulation of flavourings in e-cigarettes for harm reduction. SN - 1468-3318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27633766/Cigarette_smoking_and_electronic_cigarette_vaping_patterns_as_a_function_of_e_cigarette_flavourings_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -