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Motion sickness.
Handb Clin Neurol. 2016; 137:371-90.HC

Abstract

Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, London, UK. Electronic address: goldinj@westminster.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27638085

Citation

Golding, J F.. "Motion Sickness." Handbook of Clinical Neurology, vol. 137, 2016, pp. 371-90.
Golding JF. Motion sickness. Handb Clin Neurol. 2016;137:371-90.
Golding, J. F. (2016). Motion sickness. Handbook of Clinical Neurology, 137, 371-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63437-5.00027-3
Golding JF. Motion Sickness. Handb Clin Neurol. 2016;137:371-90. PubMed PMID: 27638085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Motion sickness. A1 - Golding,J F, PY - 2016/9/18/entrez PY - 2016/9/18/pubmed PY - 2017/2/15/medline KW - motion sickness KW - nausea KW - transport KW - vestibular KW - visual displays KW - vomiting SP - 371 EP - 90 JF - Handbook of clinical neurology JO - Handb Clin Neurol VL - 137 N2 - Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated. SN - 0072-9752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27638085/Motion_sickness_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/B978-0-444-63437-5.00027-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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