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Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct; 116(7):1306-1313.BJ

Abstract

Assessing energy requirements is a fundamental activity in clinical dietetic practice. The aim of this study was to investigate which resting energy expenditure (REE) predictive equations are the best alternatives to indirect calorimetry before and after an interdisciplinary therapy in Brazilian obese women. In all, twelve equations based on weight, height, sex, age, fat-free mass and fat mass were tested. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. The interdisciplinary therapy consisted of nutritional, physical exercise, psychological and physiotherapy support during the course of 1 year. The average differences between measured and predicted REE, as well as the accuracy at the ±10 % level, were evaluated. Statistical analysis included paired t tests, intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. Validation was based on forty obese women (BMI 30-39·9 kg/m2). Our major findings demonstrated a wide variation in the accuracy of REE predictive equations before and after weight loss in non-morbid, obese women. The equations reported by Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/United Nations University (UNU) were the only ones that did not show significant differences compared with indirect calorimetry and presented a bias <5 %. The Harris-Benedict equation provided 40 and 47·5 % accurate predictions before and after therapy, respectively. The FAO equation provided 35 and 47·5 % accurate predictions. However, the Bland-Altman analysis did not show good agreement between these equations and indirect calorimetry. Therefore, the Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/UNU equations should be used with caution for obese women. The need to critically re-assess REE data and generate regional and more homogeneous REE databases for the target population is reinforced.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.3Multimagem Clinic,Santos,SP,Brazil.4Human Movement Sciences Department,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.1Post Graduate Program of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences,Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP,Santos,SP,Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27641466

Citation

Poli, Vanessa Fadanelli Schoenardie, et al. "Resting Energy Expenditure in Obese Women: Comparison Between Measured and Estimated Values." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1306-1313.
Poli VF, Sanches RB, Moraes AD, et al. Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(7):1306-1313.
Poli, V. F., Sanches, R. B., Moraes, A. D., Fidalgo, J. P., Nascimento, M. A., Andrade-Silva, S. G., Clemente, J. C., Yi, L. C., & Caranti, D. A. (2016). Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values. The British Journal of Nutrition, 116(7), 1306-1313.
Poli VF, et al. Resting Energy Expenditure in Obese Women: Comparison Between Measured and Estimated Values. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(7):1306-1313. PubMed PMID: 27641466.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values. AU - Poli,Vanessa Fadanelli Schoenardie, AU - Sanches,Ricardo Badan, AU - Moraes,Amanda Dos Santos, AU - Fidalgo,João Pedro Novo, AU - Nascimento,Maythe Amaral, AU - Andrade-Silva,Stephan Garcia, AU - Clemente,José Carlos, AU - Yi,Liu Chiao, AU - Caranti,Danielle Arisa, Y1 - 2016/09/19/ PY - 2016/9/20/pubmed PY - 2017/5/26/medline PY - 2016/9/20/entrez KW - FFM fat-free mass KW - FM fat mass KW - ICC intraclass correlation coefficient KW - REE resting energy expenditure KW - RMSE root mean sum of squared errors KW - Indirect calorimetry KW - Obesity KW - Predictive equations KW - Weight loss SP - 1306 EP - 1313 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 116 IS - 7 N2 - Assessing energy requirements is a fundamental activity in clinical dietetic practice. The aim of this study was to investigate which resting energy expenditure (REE) predictive equations are the best alternatives to indirect calorimetry before and after an interdisciplinary therapy in Brazilian obese women. In all, twelve equations based on weight, height, sex, age, fat-free mass and fat mass were tested. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. The interdisciplinary therapy consisted of nutritional, physical exercise, psychological and physiotherapy support during the course of 1 year. The average differences between measured and predicted REE, as well as the accuracy at the ±10 % level, were evaluated. Statistical analysis included paired t tests, intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. Validation was based on forty obese women (BMI 30-39·9 kg/m2). Our major findings demonstrated a wide variation in the accuracy of REE predictive equations before and after weight loss in non-morbid, obese women. The equations reported by Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/United Nations University (UNU) were the only ones that did not show significant differences compared with indirect calorimetry and presented a bias <5 %. The Harris-Benedict equation provided 40 and 47·5 % accurate predictions before and after therapy, respectively. The FAO equation provided 35 and 47·5 % accurate predictions. However, the Bland-Altman analysis did not show good agreement between these equations and indirect calorimetry. Therefore, the Harris-Benedict and FAO/WHO/UNU equations should be used with caution for obese women. The need to critically re-assess REE data and generate regional and more homogeneous REE databases for the target population is reinforced. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27641466/Resting_energy_expenditure_in_obese_women:_comparison_between_measured_and_estimated_values_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516003172/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -