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Associations between free sugars and nutrient intakes among children and adolescents in the UK.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct; 116(7):1265-1274.BJ

Abstract

This study explored associations between free sugars intake (using non-milk extrinsic sugars as proxy) and nutrient intakes among children aged 1·5-18 years in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008-2012. Dietary records were completed by 2073 children (95 % completed 4 d). Mean free sugars intakes (% energy) were 11·8, 14·7 and 15·4 % in the 1·5-3, 4-10 and 11-18 years age groups, respectively. Nutrient intakes and nutrient density were compared across quintiles (Q1-Q5) of free sugars intake (% energy) within each age group. Energy intake rose from Q1 to Q5 of free sugars, whereas percentages of energy intake from fat, SFA and protein dropped. Associations with micronutrients (mg/d or mcg/d) were mostly non-significant, but among 11-18-year-olds there were significant negative associations with Zn, Se, Fe, Cu, and vitamin A and D. There were stronger negative associations with micronutrient density (mg/mcg per 4·18 MJ) for most nutrients in all age groups. Associations with vitamin C were positive. Results were similar after excluding misreporters. Children aged 4-18 years who consumed average amounts of free sugars or above (>13 % energy or Q3-Q5) had lower diet quality than those consuming <10 % free sugars (Q1), but there were insufficient data to assess diets with 5 % free sugars. High consumers obtained a higher proportion of free sugars from soft drinks, fruit juice and sugar confectionery and less from breakfast cereals. Ultimately, nutrient intakes depend on the total dietary pattern; however, reducing overconsumption of sugary foods and drinks with low nutrient density may help improve diet quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Sig-Nurture Ltd,Guildford,Surrey GU1 2TF,UK.1Sig-Nurture Ltd,Guildford,Surrey GU1 2TF,UK.2Sugar Nutrition UK,London WC2R 1LA,UK.3Ulster University, Belfast BT15 1ED,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27641637

Citation

Gibson, Sigrid, et al. "Associations Between Free Sugars and Nutrient Intakes Among Children and Adolescents in the UK." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1265-1274.
Gibson S, Francis L, Newens K, et al. Associations between free sugars and nutrient intakes among children and adolescents in the UK. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(7):1265-1274.
Gibson, S., Francis, L., Newens, K., & Livingstone, B. (2016). Associations between free sugars and nutrient intakes among children and adolescents in the UK. The British Journal of Nutrition, 116(7), 1265-1274.
Gibson S, et al. Associations Between Free Sugars and Nutrient Intakes Among Children and Adolescents in the UK. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(7):1265-1274. PubMed PMID: 27641637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between free sugars and nutrient intakes among children and adolescents in the UK. AU - Gibson,Sigrid, AU - Francis,Lucy, AU - Newens,Katie, AU - Livingstone,Barbara, Y1 - 2016/09/19/ PY - 2016/9/20/pubmed PY - 2017/5/26/medline PY - 2016/9/20/entrez KW - EAR estimated average requirement KW - EI energy intake KW - NDNS National Diet and Nutrition Survey KW - NMES non-milk extrinsic sugars KW - Diets KW - Micronutrient intakes KW - Recommendations KW - Sugars SP - 1265 EP - 1274 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 116 IS - 7 N2 - This study explored associations between free sugars intake (using non-milk extrinsic sugars as proxy) and nutrient intakes among children aged 1·5-18 years in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008-2012. Dietary records were completed by 2073 children (95 % completed 4 d). Mean free sugars intakes (% energy) were 11·8, 14·7 and 15·4 % in the 1·5-3, 4-10 and 11-18 years age groups, respectively. Nutrient intakes and nutrient density were compared across quintiles (Q1-Q5) of free sugars intake (% energy) within each age group. Energy intake rose from Q1 to Q5 of free sugars, whereas percentages of energy intake from fat, SFA and protein dropped. Associations with micronutrients (mg/d or mcg/d) were mostly non-significant, but among 11-18-year-olds there were significant negative associations with Zn, Se, Fe, Cu, and vitamin A and D. There were stronger negative associations with micronutrient density (mg/mcg per 4·18 MJ) for most nutrients in all age groups. Associations with vitamin C were positive. Results were similar after excluding misreporters. Children aged 4-18 years who consumed average amounts of free sugars or above (>13 % energy or Q3-Q5) had lower diet quality than those consuming <10 % free sugars (Q1), but there were insufficient data to assess diets with 5 % free sugars. High consumers obtained a higher proportion of free sugars from soft drinks, fruit juice and sugar confectionery and less from breakfast cereals. Ultimately, nutrient intakes depend on the total dietary pattern; however, reducing overconsumption of sugary foods and drinks with low nutrient density may help improve diet quality. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27641637/Associations_between_free_sugars_and_nutrient_intakes_among_children_and_adolescents_in_the_UK_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516003184/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -