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Immunity to Rice Blast Disease by Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis.
Curr Biol. 2016 09 26; 26(18):2399-2411.CB

Abstract

Hemibiotrophic pathogens are some of the most destructive plant pathogens, causing huge economic losses and threatening global food security. Infection with these organisms often involves an initial biotrophic infection phase, during which the pathogen spreads in host tissue asymptomatically, followed by a necrotrophic phase, during which host-cell death is induced. How hemibiotrophic pathogens trigger host necrosis and how plants inhibit the transition from the biotrophic stage to the necrotrophic stage in disease symptom expression are mainly unknown. The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae spreads in rice biotrophically early during infection, but this biotrophic stage is followed by a pronounced switch to cell death and lesion formation. Here, we show that the M. oryzae effector AvrPiz-t interacts with the bZIP-type transcription factor APIP5 in the cytoplasm and suppresses its transcriptional activity and protein accumulation at the necrotrophic stage. Silencing of APIP5 in transgenic rice leads to cell death, and the phenotype is enhanced by the expression of AvrPiz-t. Conversely, Piz-t interacts with and stabilizes APIP5 to prevent necrosis at the necrotrophic stage. At the same time, APIP5 is essential for Piz-t stability. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the suppression of effector-triggered necrosis at the necrotrophic stage by an NLR receptor in plants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Utilization and College of Agronomy, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan 410128, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China.Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Utilization and College of Agronomy, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan 410128, China.Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: wang.620@osu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27641772

Citation

Wang, Ruyi, et al. "Immunity to Rice Blast Disease By Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis." Current Biology : CB, vol. 26, no. 18, 2016, pp. 2399-2411.
Wang R, Ning Y, Shi X, et al. Immunity to Rice Blast Disease by Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis. Curr Biol. 2016;26(18):2399-2411.
Wang, R., Ning, Y., Shi, X., He, F., Zhang, C., Fan, J., Jiang, N., Zhang, Y., Zhang, T., Hu, Y., Bellizzi, M., & Wang, G. L. (2016). Immunity to Rice Blast Disease by Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis. Current Biology : CB, 26(18), 2399-2411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.06.072
Wang R, et al. Immunity to Rice Blast Disease By Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis. Curr Biol. 2016 09 26;26(18):2399-2411. PubMed PMID: 27641772.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immunity to Rice Blast Disease by Suppression of Effector-Triggered Necrosis. AU - Wang,Ruyi, AU - Ning,Yuese, AU - Shi,Xuetao, AU - He,Feng, AU - Zhang,Chongyang, AU - Fan,Jiangbo, AU - Jiang,Nan, AU - Zhang,Yu, AU - Zhang,Ting, AU - Hu,Yajun, AU - Bellizzi,Maria, AU - Wang,Guo-Liang, Y1 - 2016/09/15/ PY - 2016/05/25/received PY - 2016/06/30/revised PY - 2016/06/30/accepted PY - 2016/9/20/entrez PY - 2016/9/20/pubmed PY - 2017/12/28/medline KW - APIP5 KW - Magnaporthe oryzae KW - NLR receptor KW - bZIP transcription factor KW - cell death KW - effector target KW - effector-triggered immunity KW - effector-triggered necrosis KW - hemibiotrophic pathogens KW - rice blast SP - 2399 EP - 2411 JF - Current biology : CB JO - Curr Biol VL - 26 IS - 18 N2 - Hemibiotrophic pathogens are some of the most destructive plant pathogens, causing huge economic losses and threatening global food security. Infection with these organisms often involves an initial biotrophic infection phase, during which the pathogen spreads in host tissue asymptomatically, followed by a necrotrophic phase, during which host-cell death is induced. How hemibiotrophic pathogens trigger host necrosis and how plants inhibit the transition from the biotrophic stage to the necrotrophic stage in disease symptom expression are mainly unknown. The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae spreads in rice biotrophically early during infection, but this biotrophic stage is followed by a pronounced switch to cell death and lesion formation. Here, we show that the M. oryzae effector AvrPiz-t interacts with the bZIP-type transcription factor APIP5 in the cytoplasm and suppresses its transcriptional activity and protein accumulation at the necrotrophic stage. Silencing of APIP5 in transgenic rice leads to cell death, and the phenotype is enhanced by the expression of AvrPiz-t. Conversely, Piz-t interacts with and stabilizes APIP5 to prevent necrosis at the necrotrophic stage. At the same time, APIP5 is essential for Piz-t stability. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the suppression of effector-triggered necrosis at the necrotrophic stage by an NLR receptor in plants. SN - 1879-0445 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27641772/Immunity_to_Rice_Blast_Disease_by_Suppression_of_Effector_Triggered_Necrosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960-9822(16)30751-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -