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Human intravascular immunoglobulin responses to exercise-heat and hypohydration.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989 Jul; 60(7):634-8.AS

Abstract

Several investigators have suggested that prolonged exercise and hypohydration alter the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins. Those studies, however, have methodological concerns which make generalizations from their data very tenuous. This study examined the effects of prolonged moderate intensity exercise in the heat and hypohydration on changes in the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins. Five heat-acclimated males attempted two Heat Stress Tests (HSTs). One HST was completed when subjects were euhydrated and the other HST when subjects were hypohydrated (-5% from base line body weight). The HSTs consisted of 30 min of rest in a 20 degrees C antechamber, followed by a 120-min exposure (2 repeats of 15 min rest and 45 min walking) in a hot (35 degrees C, 45% rh) environment. The following observations were made concerning immunoglobulin responses to hypohydration and exercise-heat stress: a) the changes in concentrations (mg.dl-1) of the measured immunoglobulins were often a reflection of changes in the plasma volume; b) hypohydration increased the intravascular mass (g) of the complement enzyme C3 during resting conditions, but did not alter the intravascular mass of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and c) prolonged treadmill exercise in the heat, when either euhydrated or hypohydrated, did not alter the intravascular mass of IgG, IgA, IgM, and C3. These data indicate that the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins does not change during prolonged moderate intensity exercise in the heat, and that hypohydration results in a translocation of C3 to the intravascular space. In addition, these data indicate that immunoglobulins do not provide a stress index for hypohydration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760-5007.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2764844

Citation

Sawka, M N., et al. "Human Intravascular Immunoglobulin Responses to Exercise-heat and Hypohydration." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 60, no. 7, 1989, pp. 634-8.
Sawka MN, Young AJ, Dennis RC, et al. Human intravascular immunoglobulin responses to exercise-heat and hypohydration. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989;60(7):634-8.
Sawka, M. N., Young, A. J., Dennis, R. C., Gonzalez, R. R., Pandolf, K. B., & Valeri, C. R. (1989). Human intravascular immunoglobulin responses to exercise-heat and hypohydration. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 60(7), 634-8.
Sawka MN, et al. Human Intravascular Immunoglobulin Responses to Exercise-heat and Hypohydration. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989;60(7):634-8. PubMed PMID: 2764844.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human intravascular immunoglobulin responses to exercise-heat and hypohydration. AU - Sawka,M N, AU - Young,A J, AU - Dennis,R C, AU - Gonzalez,R R, AU - Pandolf,K B, AU - Valeri,C R, PY - 1989/7/1/pubmed PY - 1989/7/1/medline PY - 1989/7/1/entrez SP - 634 EP - 8 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 60 IS - 7 N2 - Several investigators have suggested that prolonged exercise and hypohydration alter the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins. Those studies, however, have methodological concerns which make generalizations from their data very tenuous. This study examined the effects of prolonged moderate intensity exercise in the heat and hypohydration on changes in the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins. Five heat-acclimated males attempted two Heat Stress Tests (HSTs). One HST was completed when subjects were euhydrated and the other HST when subjects were hypohydrated (-5% from base line body weight). The HSTs consisted of 30 min of rest in a 20 degrees C antechamber, followed by a 120-min exposure (2 repeats of 15 min rest and 45 min walking) in a hot (35 degrees C, 45% rh) environment. The following observations were made concerning immunoglobulin responses to hypohydration and exercise-heat stress: a) the changes in concentrations (mg.dl-1) of the measured immunoglobulins were often a reflection of changes in the plasma volume; b) hypohydration increased the intravascular mass (g) of the complement enzyme C3 during resting conditions, but did not alter the intravascular mass of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and c) prolonged treadmill exercise in the heat, when either euhydrated or hypohydrated, did not alter the intravascular mass of IgG, IgA, IgM, and C3. These data indicate that the intravascular mass of immunoglobulins does not change during prolonged moderate intensity exercise in the heat, and that hypohydration results in a translocation of C3 to the intravascular space. In addition, these data indicate that immunoglobulins do not provide a stress index for hypohydration. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2764844/Human_intravascular_immunoglobulin_responses_to_exercise_heat_and_hypohydration_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dehydration.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -