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Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2016 Dec; 9(12):933-941.CP

Abstract

Little information exists on diet and prostate cancer progression. We examined the association between intakes of total red meat, processed and unprocessed red meat, poultry, fish, and eggs and prostate cancer recurrence. We conducted a prospective study of 971 men treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer between 2003 and 2010. Men completed a food frequency questionnaire at diagnosis. We used logistic regression to study the association between diet and high-grade or advanced-stage disease. We used Cox models to study the risk of progression [N = 94 events, mainly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence]. Total red meat intake was marginally associated with risk of high-grade disease [Gleason ≥ 4+3; adjusted OR top vs. bottom quartile: 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-2.97; Ptrend = 0.05], as was very high intake of eggs (OR top decile vs. bottom quartile: 1.98; 95% CI, 1.08-3.63, Ptrend = 0.08). Well-done red meat was associated with advanced disease (≥pT3; OR top vs. bottom quartile: 1.74, 95% CI, 1.05-2.90; Ptrend = 0.01). Intakes of red meat, fish, and eggs were not associated with progression. Very high poultry intake was inversely associated with progression (HR top decile vs. bottom quartile: 0.19; 95% CI, 0.06-0.63; Ptrend = 0.02). Substituting 30 g/d of poultry or fish for total or unprocessed red meat was associated with significantly lower risk of recurrence. Lower intakes of red meat and well-done red meat and higher intakes of poultry and fish are associated with lower risk of high grade and advanced prostate cancer and reduced recurrence risk, independent of stage and grade. Cancer Prev Res; 9(12); 933-41. ©2016 AACR.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. kwilson@hsph.harvard.edu. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27651069

Citation

Wilson, Kathryn M., et al. "Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression." Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.), vol. 9, no. 12, 2016, pp. 933-941.
Wilson KM, Mucci LA, Drake BF, et al. Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2016;9(12):933-941.
Wilson, K. M., Mucci, L. A., Drake, B. F., Preston, M. A., Stampfer, M. J., Giovannucci, E., & Kibel, A. S. (2016). Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression. Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.), 9(12), 933-941.
Wilson KM, et al. Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2016;9(12):933-941. PubMed PMID: 27651069.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat, Fish, Poultry, and Egg Intake at Diagnosis and Risk of Prostate Cancer Progression. AU - Wilson,Kathryn M, AU - Mucci,Lorelei A, AU - Drake,Bettina F, AU - Preston,Mark A, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Kibel,Adam S, Y1 - 2016/09/20/ PY - 2016/03/09/received PY - 2016/08/12/revised PY - 2016/09/12/accepted PY - 2016/9/22/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2016/9/22/entrez SP - 933 EP - 941 JF - Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.) JO - Cancer Prev Res (Phila) VL - 9 IS - 12 N2 - Little information exists on diet and prostate cancer progression. We examined the association between intakes of total red meat, processed and unprocessed red meat, poultry, fish, and eggs and prostate cancer recurrence. We conducted a prospective study of 971 men treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer between 2003 and 2010. Men completed a food frequency questionnaire at diagnosis. We used logistic regression to study the association between diet and high-grade or advanced-stage disease. We used Cox models to study the risk of progression [N = 94 events, mainly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence]. Total red meat intake was marginally associated with risk of high-grade disease [Gleason ≥ 4+3; adjusted OR top vs. bottom quartile: 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-2.97; Ptrend = 0.05], as was very high intake of eggs (OR top decile vs. bottom quartile: 1.98; 95% CI, 1.08-3.63, Ptrend = 0.08). Well-done red meat was associated with advanced disease (≥pT3; OR top vs. bottom quartile: 1.74, 95% CI, 1.05-2.90; Ptrend = 0.01). Intakes of red meat, fish, and eggs were not associated with progression. Very high poultry intake was inversely associated with progression (HR top decile vs. bottom quartile: 0.19; 95% CI, 0.06-0.63; Ptrend = 0.02). Substituting 30 g/d of poultry or fish for total or unprocessed red meat was associated with significantly lower risk of recurrence. Lower intakes of red meat and well-done red meat and higher intakes of poultry and fish are associated with lower risk of high grade and advanced prostate cancer and reduced recurrence risk, independent of stage and grade. Cancer Prev Res; 9(12); 933-41. ©2016 AACR. SN - 1940-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27651069/Meat_Fish_Poultry_and_Egg_Intake_at_Diagnosis_and_Risk_of_Prostate_Cancer_Progression_ L2 - http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=27651069 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -