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Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 11; 40(11):2435-2444.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The acute consumption of excessive quantities of alcohol causes well-recognized neurophysiological and cognitive alterations. As people reach advanced age, they are more prone to cognitive decline. To date, the interaction of current heavy alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) consumption and aging remains unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that negative consequences of current heavy alcohol consumption on neurocognitive function are worse with advanced age. Further, we evaluated the relations between lifetime history of alcohol dependence and neurocognitive function METHODS: Sixty-six participants underwent a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Current heavy EtOH drinkers were classified using National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria (EtOH heavy, n = 21) based on the Timeline follow-back and a structured clinical interview and compared to nondrinkers, and moderate drinkers (EtOH low, n = 45). Of the total population, 53.3% had a lifetime history of alcohol dependence. Neurocognitive data were grouped and analyzed relative to global and domain scores assessing: global cognitive function, attention/executive function, learning, memory, motor function, verbal function, and speed of processing.

RESULTS

Heavy current EtOH consumption in older adults was associated with poorer global cognitive function, learning, memory, and motor function (ps < 0.05). Furthermore, lifetime history of alcohol dependence was associated with poorer function in the same neurocognitive domains, in addition to the attention/executive domain, irrespective of age (ps < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that while heavy current alcohol consumption is associated with significant impairment in a number of neurocognitive domains, history of alcohol dependence, even in the absence of heavy current alcohol use, is associated with lasting negative consequences for neurocognitive function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory (CAM), Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. ajwoods@ufl.edu.Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory (CAM), Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory (CAM), Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory (CAM), Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Alcohol Research Center on HIV (ARCH), Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Alcohol Research Center on HIV (ARCH), Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island.Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory (CAM), Institute on Aging, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27658235

Citation

Woods, Adam J., et al. "Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption Is Associated With Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 40, no. 11, 2016, pp. 2435-2444.
Woods AJ, Porges EC, Bryant VE, et al. Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016;40(11):2435-2444.
Woods, A. J., Porges, E. C., Bryant, V. E., Seider, T., Gongvatana, A., Kahler, C. W., de la Monte, S., Monti, P. M., & Cohen, R. A. (2016). Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 40(11), 2435-2444. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13211
Woods AJ, et al. Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption Is Associated With Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016;40(11):2435-2444. PubMed PMID: 27658235.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Greater Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults. AU - Woods,Adam J, AU - Porges,Eric C, AU - Bryant,Vaughn E, AU - Seider,Talia, AU - Gongvatana,Assawin, AU - Kahler,Christopher W, AU - de la Monte,Suzanne, AU - Monti,Peter M, AU - Cohen,Ronald A, Y1 - 2016/09/22/ PY - 2016/03/29/received PY - 2016/08/04/accepted PY - 2016/10/21/pubmed PY - 2017/6/22/medline PY - 2016/9/23/entrez KW - Alcohol Consumption KW - Alcohol Dependence KW - Cognitive Aging KW - Cognitive Impairment KW - EtOH SP - 2435 EP - 2444 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 40 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The acute consumption of excessive quantities of alcohol causes well-recognized neurophysiological and cognitive alterations. As people reach advanced age, they are more prone to cognitive decline. To date, the interaction of current heavy alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) consumption and aging remains unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that negative consequences of current heavy alcohol consumption on neurocognitive function are worse with advanced age. Further, we evaluated the relations between lifetime history of alcohol dependence and neurocognitive function METHODS: Sixty-six participants underwent a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Current heavy EtOH drinkers were classified using National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism criteria (EtOH heavy, n = 21) based on the Timeline follow-back and a structured clinical interview and compared to nondrinkers, and moderate drinkers (EtOH low, n = 45). Of the total population, 53.3% had a lifetime history of alcohol dependence. Neurocognitive data were grouped and analyzed relative to global and domain scores assessing: global cognitive function, attention/executive function, learning, memory, motor function, verbal function, and speed of processing. RESULTS: Heavy current EtOH consumption in older adults was associated with poorer global cognitive function, learning, memory, and motor function (ps < 0.05). Furthermore, lifetime history of alcohol dependence was associated with poorer function in the same neurocognitive domains, in addition to the attention/executive domain, irrespective of age (ps < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that while heavy current alcohol consumption is associated with significant impairment in a number of neurocognitive domains, history of alcohol dependence, even in the absence of heavy current alcohol use, is associated with lasting negative consequences for neurocognitive function. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27658235/Current_Heavy_Alcohol_Consumption_is_Associated_with_Greater_Cognitive_Impairment_in_Older_Adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.13211 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -