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Alcohol consumption and mortality after breast cancer diagnosis: The health and functioning in women study.
Breast Dis 2016; 36(2-3):77-89BD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the association of prediagnostic alcohol consumption with long-term mortality from breast cancer and other causes in a cohort of women with breast cancer.

METHODS

We studied a Michigan-based cohort of 939 women aged 40-84 years, who provided complete information about the type, amount and intensity of prediagnostic alcohol consumption. Associations of alcohol consumption, based on weekly volume of alcohol consumption during the year prior to breast cancer diagnosis, with mortality were evaluated in Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, body mass index, smoking, comorbidity, tumor characteristics, and treatment. Differences among covariates were assessed with Pearson χ2 , Student t -tests and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

During a median follow-up of 11 years, 724 deaths occurred overall, with 303 from breast cancer. Fifty-five percent of the women were categorized as drinkers with volume of alcohol consumption ranging from 0.75 to 36.00 drinks/week. In multivariable models, a decreased risk of other-cause mortality was associated with low alcohol drinking (0.75-3.75 drinks/week; HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.47-0.78), moderate volume alcohol drinking (4.00-9.75 drinks/week; HR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.39-0.85) and low frequency (0.75-3.75 drinks/week) beer and wine intake (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.50-0.96 and HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.52-0.88 respectively). Although the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality was not statistically significantly associated with moderate (4.00-9.75 drinks/week) and high volume (10.00-36.00 drinks/week) alcohol drinking in the overall cohort (HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 95% 0.97-2.12 and HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.87-2.70 respectively), there was a positive association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer-specific mortality among current smokers (HR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.03-3.57; Pinteraction = 0.04).

CONCLUSION

In this prospective cohort study, regular consumption of 0.75-36.00 alcoholic drinks per week during the year prior to breast cancer diagnosis was associated with a reduction in other-cause mortality and with an increase in breast cancer-specific mortality among current smokers, after taking into account clinical and sociodemographic factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27662274

Citation

Din, Natasha, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Mortality After Breast Cancer Diagnosis: the Health and Functioning in Women Study." Breast Disease, vol. 36, no. 2-3, 2016, pp. 77-89.
Din N, Allen IE, Satariano WA, et al. Alcohol consumption and mortality after breast cancer diagnosis: The health and functioning in women study. Breast Dis. 2016;36(2-3):77-89.
Din, N., Allen, I. E., Satariano, W. A., Demb, J., & Braithwaite, D. (2016). Alcohol consumption and mortality after breast cancer diagnosis: The health and functioning in women study. Breast Disease, 36(2-3), pp. 77-89. doi:10.3233/BD-150202.
Din N, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Mortality After Breast Cancer Diagnosis: the Health and Functioning in Women Study. Breast Dis. 2016 Jul 28;36(2-3):77-89. PubMed PMID: 27662274.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and mortality after breast cancer diagnosis: The health and functioning in women study. AU - Din,Natasha, AU - Allen,Isabel Elaine, AU - Satariano,William A, AU - Demb,Joshua, AU - Braithwaite,Dejana, PY - 2016/9/24/entrez PY - 2016/9/24/pubmed PY - 2017/3/14/medline KW - Breast cancer KW - alcohol consumption KW - mortality KW - prospective cohort study SP - 77 EP - 89 JF - Breast disease JO - Breast Dis VL - 36 IS - 2-3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of prediagnostic alcohol consumption with long-term mortality from breast cancer and other causes in a cohort of women with breast cancer. METHODS: We studied a Michigan-based cohort of 939 women aged 40-84 years, who provided complete information about the type, amount and intensity of prediagnostic alcohol consumption. Associations of alcohol consumption, based on weekly volume of alcohol consumption during the year prior to breast cancer diagnosis, with mortality were evaluated in Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, body mass index, smoking, comorbidity, tumor characteristics, and treatment. Differences among covariates were assessed with Pearson χ2 , Student t -tests and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 11 years, 724 deaths occurred overall, with 303 from breast cancer. Fifty-five percent of the women were categorized as drinkers with volume of alcohol consumption ranging from 0.75 to 36.00 drinks/week. In multivariable models, a decreased risk of other-cause mortality was associated with low alcohol drinking (0.75-3.75 drinks/week; HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.47-0.78), moderate volume alcohol drinking (4.00-9.75 drinks/week; HR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.39-0.85) and low frequency (0.75-3.75 drinks/week) beer and wine intake (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.50-0.96 and HR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.52-0.88 respectively). Although the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality was not statistically significantly associated with moderate (4.00-9.75 drinks/week) and high volume (10.00-36.00 drinks/week) alcohol drinking in the overall cohort (HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 95% 0.97-2.12 and HR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.87-2.70 respectively), there was a positive association of alcohol consumption with breast cancer-specific mortality among current smokers (HR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.03-3.57; Pinteraction = 0.04). CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort study, regular consumption of 0.75-36.00 alcoholic drinks per week during the year prior to breast cancer diagnosis was associated with a reduction in other-cause mortality and with an increase in breast cancer-specific mortality among current smokers, after taking into account clinical and sociodemographic factors. SN - 1558-1551 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27662274/Alcohol_consumption_and_mortality_after_breast_cancer_diagnosis:_The_health_and_functioning_in_women_study_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/BD-150202 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -