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Criminal justice involvement history is associated with better HIV care continuum metrics among a population-based sample of young black MSM.
AIDS 2017; 31(1):159-165AIDS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine how history of criminal justice involvement (CJI) is related to HIV care continuum metrics among young black MSM 16-29 years of age.

DESIGN

Population-based survey.

METHODS

From 2013 to 2014, a representative sample of young black MSM was generated using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Chicago (n = 618). HIV antibody/antigen and RNA testing were performed using dry blood spots. Factors assessed in the care continuum included HIV testing, HIV diagnosis, linkage to care within 6 months, retention in care, adherence to antiretrovirals, and viral suppression. RDS-weighted regression models examined the associations between history of CJI, including frequency of CJI and durations of stay and each of the continuum metrics.

RESULTS

A final analytic sample of 618 participants was generated through RDS chains of up to 13 waves in length and with a mean of 2.1 recruits per participant. At enrollment, 40.8% had prior history of CJI and 34.6% were HIV seropositive. Of persons reporting HIV seropositive status, 58.4% were linked to care, 40.2% were retained in care, 32.2% were adherent to antiretrovirals, and 24.3% were virally suppressed. Any CJI history was associated with the overall care continuum (adjusted odds ratio = 2.35; 95% confidence interval 1.13-4.88) and was most associated with increased retention in care [adjusted odds ratio = 3.72 (1.77-7.84)]. Having one CJI experience and detention for only 1 day was associated with better retention in care compared with no or more frequent CJI.

CONCLUSION

Those with a previous history of CJI were more successful in achieving most HIV care continuum metrics. Frequent and cycling CJI, however, was detrimental to HIV care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Public Health Sciences bDepartment of Medicine cNORC at the University of Chicago, University of Chicago dChicago Center for HIV Elimination eSchool of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois fDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington gNational Development and Research Institutes, New York, New York hDepartment of Sociology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27662544

Citation

Schneider, John A., et al. "Criminal Justice Involvement History Is Associated With Better HIV Care Continuum Metrics Among a Population-based Sample of Young Black MSM." AIDS (London, England), vol. 31, no. 1, 2017, pp. 159-165.
Schneider JA, Kozloski M, Michaels S, et al. Criminal justice involvement history is associated with better HIV care continuum metrics among a population-based sample of young black MSM. AIDS. 2017;31(1):159-165.
Schneider, J. A., Kozloski, M., Michaels, S., Skaathun, B., Voisin, D., Lancki, N., ... Schumm, P. (2017). Criminal justice involvement history is associated with better HIV care continuum metrics among a population-based sample of young black MSM. AIDS (London, England), 31(1), pp. 159-165.
Schneider JA, et al. Criminal Justice Involvement History Is Associated With Better HIV Care Continuum Metrics Among a Population-based Sample of Young Black MSM. AIDS. 2017 01 2;31(1):159-165. PubMed PMID: 27662544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Criminal justice involvement history is associated with better HIV care continuum metrics among a population-based sample of young black MSM. AU - Schneider,John A, AU - Kozloski,Michael, AU - Michaels,Stuart, AU - Skaathun,Britt, AU - Voisin,Dexter, AU - Lancki,Nicola, AU - Morgan,Ethan, AU - Khanna,Aditya, AU - Green,Keith, AU - Coombs,Robert W, AU - Friedman,Samuel R, AU - Laumann,Edward, AU - Schumm,Phil, AU - ,, PY - 2016/9/24/pubmed PY - 2017/12/21/medline PY - 2016/9/24/entrez SP - 159 EP - 165 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine how history of criminal justice involvement (CJI) is related to HIV care continuum metrics among young black MSM 16-29 years of age. DESIGN: Population-based survey. METHODS: From 2013 to 2014, a representative sample of young black MSM was generated using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Chicago (n = 618). HIV antibody/antigen and RNA testing were performed using dry blood spots. Factors assessed in the care continuum included HIV testing, HIV diagnosis, linkage to care within 6 months, retention in care, adherence to antiretrovirals, and viral suppression. RDS-weighted regression models examined the associations between history of CJI, including frequency of CJI and durations of stay and each of the continuum metrics. RESULTS: A final analytic sample of 618 participants was generated through RDS chains of up to 13 waves in length and with a mean of 2.1 recruits per participant. At enrollment, 40.8% had prior history of CJI and 34.6% were HIV seropositive. Of persons reporting HIV seropositive status, 58.4% were linked to care, 40.2% were retained in care, 32.2% were adherent to antiretrovirals, and 24.3% were virally suppressed. Any CJI history was associated with the overall care continuum (adjusted odds ratio = 2.35; 95% confidence interval 1.13-4.88) and was most associated with increased retention in care [adjusted odds ratio = 3.72 (1.77-7.84)]. Having one CJI experience and detention for only 1 day was associated with better retention in care compared with no or more frequent CJI. CONCLUSION: Those with a previous history of CJI were more successful in achieving most HIV care continuum metrics. Frequent and cycling CJI, however, was detrimental to HIV care. SN - 1473-5571 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27662544/Criminal_justice_involvement_history_is_associated_with_better_HIV_care_continuum_metrics_among_a_population_based_sample_of_young_black_MSM_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=27662544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -