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Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic.
Curr Obes Rep. 2016 Dec; 5(4):449-455.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

We explore how a global shift in the food system caused by global economic growth, increase in available food per capita and in food processing is a driver of the obesity epidemic.

RECENT FINDINGS

Economic development in most areas of the world has resulted in increased purchasing power and available per capita food. Supermarkets and a growing fast-food industry have transformed our dietary pattern. Ultra-processed food rich on sugars and saturated fat is now the major source of energy in most countries. The shift in food supply is considered a major driver of the obesity epidemic and the increasing prevalence of accompanying complications, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, the global shift might also have direct effects on the increase in type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, independently of overweight and obesity. The shift in the food supply is a major driver of the obesity epidemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. bjos@steno.dk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27696237

Citation

Zobel, Emilie H., et al. "Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic." Current Obesity Reports, vol. 5, no. 4, 2016, pp. 449-455.
Zobel EH, Hansen TW, Rossing P, et al. Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic. Curr Obes Rep. 2016;5(4):449-455.
Zobel, E. H., Hansen, T. W., Rossing, P., & von Scholten, B. J. (2016). Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic. Current Obesity Reports, 5(4), 449-455.
Zobel EH, et al. Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic. Curr Obes Rep. 2016;5(4):449-455. PubMed PMID: 27696237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Global Changes in Food Supply and the Obesity Epidemic. AU - Zobel,Emilie H, AU - Hansen,Tine W, AU - Rossing,Peter, AU - von Scholten,Bernt Johan, PY - 2016/10/4/pubmed PY - 2017/3/14/medline PY - 2016/10/4/entrez KW - Food supply KW - Obesity KW - Ultra-processed food SP - 449 EP - 455 JF - Current obesity reports JO - Curr Obes Rep VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We explore how a global shift in the food system caused by global economic growth, increase in available food per capita and in food processing is a driver of the obesity epidemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Economic development in most areas of the world has resulted in increased purchasing power and available per capita food. Supermarkets and a growing fast-food industry have transformed our dietary pattern. Ultra-processed food rich on sugars and saturated fat is now the major source of energy in most countries. The shift in food supply is considered a major driver of the obesity epidemic and the increasing prevalence of accompanying complications, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, the global shift might also have direct effects on the increase in type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, independently of overweight and obesity. The shift in the food supply is a major driver of the obesity epidemic. SN - 2162-4968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27696237/Global_Changes_in_Food_Supply_and_the_Obesity_Epidemic_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13679-016-0233-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -