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Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome.
Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Aug; 36(6):1550-1556.NU

Abstract

AIMS

To assess the rates of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children, adolescents and adults with Down Syndrome, a genetic syndrome caused by partial or complete triplication (trisomy) of chromosome 21 and characterized by typical facial features, a physical growth delay and mild or moderate intellectual disability.

METHODS

Three hundred and seventeen persons with Down Syndrome (4-51 years) were recruited through a German parent support group (59.6% male, mean age 19.2 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC) for parents or for adults were filled out by parents or care-givers.

RESULTS

17.2% of the sample had nocturnal enuresis, 15.9% had daytime urinary incontinence, and 14.2% had fecal incontinence. Incontinence was present in 64.0% of young children (4-12 years), 10.3% of teens (13-17 years), 12.8% of young adults (18-30 years) and in 22.4% of older adults (>30 years). 13.6% of children and 8.4% of adults had a DBC score in the clinical range. 19.5% of children and 27.8% of adults with incontinence had behavioral problems. There was a significant association between nocturnal enuresis, daytime urinary incontinence and clinical DBC scores in adults.

CONCLUSIONS

Incontinence in Down Syndrome is mainly present in young children and increases in older adults. Behavioral comorbidity is associated with incontinence only in adults with Down Syndrome. Screening and treatment of incontinence in individuals with Down Syndrome is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University Hospital, Homburg, Germany.Department of Clinical Genetics, Governor Kremers Centre, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27701769

Citation

Niemczyk, Justine, et al. "Incontinence in Persons With Down Syndrome." Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol. 36, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1550-1556.
Niemczyk J, von Gontard A, Equit M, et al. Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome. Neurourol Urodyn. 2017;36(6):1550-1556.
Niemczyk, J., von Gontard, A., Equit, M., Medoff, D., Wagner, C., & Curfs, L. (2017). Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 36(6), 1550-1556. https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.23146
Niemczyk J, et al. Incontinence in Persons With Down Syndrome. Neurourol Urodyn. 2017;36(6):1550-1556. PubMed PMID: 27701769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incontinence in persons with Down Syndrome. AU - Niemczyk,Justine, AU - von Gontard,Alexander, AU - Equit,Monika, AU - Medoff,David, AU - Wagner,Catharina, AU - Curfs,Leopold, Y1 - 2016/10/04/ PY - 2016/04/14/received PY - 2016/09/05/accepted PY - 2016/10/5/pubmed PY - 2018/8/24/medline PY - 2016/10/5/entrez KW - Down Syndrome KW - enuresis KW - fecal incontinence KW - psychopathology KW - urinary incontinence SP - 1550 EP - 1556 JF - Neurourology and urodynamics JO - Neurourol Urodyn VL - 36 IS - 6 N2 - AIMS: To assess the rates of incontinence and associated psychological problems in children, adolescents and adults with Down Syndrome, a genetic syndrome caused by partial or complete triplication (trisomy) of chromosome 21 and characterized by typical facial features, a physical growth delay and mild or moderate intellectual disability. METHODS: Three hundred and seventeen persons with Down Syndrome (4-51 years) were recruited through a German parent support group (59.6% male, mean age 19.2 years). The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the Incontinence Questionnaire-Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC) for parents or for adults were filled out by parents or care-givers. RESULTS: 17.2% of the sample had nocturnal enuresis, 15.9% had daytime urinary incontinence, and 14.2% had fecal incontinence. Incontinence was present in 64.0% of young children (4-12 years), 10.3% of teens (13-17 years), 12.8% of young adults (18-30 years) and in 22.4% of older adults (>30 years). 13.6% of children and 8.4% of adults had a DBC score in the clinical range. 19.5% of children and 27.8% of adults with incontinence had behavioral problems. There was a significant association between nocturnal enuresis, daytime urinary incontinence and clinical DBC scores in adults. CONCLUSIONS: Incontinence in Down Syndrome is mainly present in young children and increases in older adults. Behavioral comorbidity is associated with incontinence only in adults with Down Syndrome. Screening and treatment of incontinence in individuals with Down Syndrome is recommended. SN - 1520-6777 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27701769/Incontinence_in_persons_with_Down_Syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.23146 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -