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Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline.
Ann Pharmacother 2017; 51(2):118-124AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There are few studies of the association between the use of antioxidant vitamin supplements and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cognitive decline is generally viewed as part of the continuum between normal aging and AD.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate whether the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with reduced risks of cognitive impairment, not dementia (CIND), AD, or all-cause dementia in a representative sample of older persons ≥65 years old.

METHODS

Data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (1991-2002), a cohort study of dementia including 3 evaluation waves at 5-yearly intervals, were used. Exposure to vitamins E and C was self-reported at baseline in a risk factor questionnaire and/or in a clinical examination.

RESULTS

The data set included 5269 individuals. Compared with those not taking vitamin supplements, the age-, sex-, and education-adjusted hazard ratios of CIND, AD, and all-cause dementia were, respectively, 0.77 (95% CI = 0.60-0.98), 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.86), and 0.62 (95% CI = 0.46-0.83) for those taking vitamin E and/or C supplements. Results remained significant in fully adjusted models except for CIND. Similar results were observed when vitamins were analyzed separately.

CONCLUSIONS

This analysis suggests that the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Further investigations are needed to determine their value as a primary prevention strategy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Centre d'excellence sur le vieillissement de Québec, CHU de Québec Research Center, Québec, QC, Canada.1 Centre d'excellence sur le vieillissement de Québec, CHU de Québec Research Center, Québec, QC, Canada.2 Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Chicoutimi, Saguenay, QC, Canada.1 Centre d'excellence sur le vieillissement de Québec, CHU de Québec Research Center, Québec, QC, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27708183

Citation

Basambombo, Luta Luse, et al. "Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline." The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, vol. 51, no. 2, 2017, pp. 118-124.
Basambombo LL, Carmichael PH, Côté S, et al. Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline. Ann Pharmacother. 2017;51(2):118-124.
Basambombo, L. L., Carmichael, P. H., Côté, S., & Laurin, D. (2017). Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 51(2), pp. 118-124. doi:10.1177/1060028016673072.
Basambombo LL, et al. Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline. Ann Pharmacother. 2017;51(2):118-124. PubMed PMID: 27708183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of Vitamin E and C Supplements for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline. AU - Basambombo,Luta Luse, AU - Carmichael,Pierre-Hugues, AU - Côté,Sharlène, AU - Laurin,Danielle, Y1 - 2016/10/05/ PY - 2016/10/21/pubmed PY - 2017/8/17/medline PY - 2016/10/7/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - antioxidants KW - cognition KW - elderly KW - observational study KW - vitamin supplement SP - 118 EP - 124 JF - The Annals of pharmacotherapy JO - Ann Pharmacother VL - 51 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: There are few studies of the association between the use of antioxidant vitamin supplements and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cognitive decline is generally viewed as part of the continuum between normal aging and AD. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with reduced risks of cognitive impairment, not dementia (CIND), AD, or all-cause dementia in a representative sample of older persons ≥65 years old. METHODS: Data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (1991-2002), a cohort study of dementia including 3 evaluation waves at 5-yearly intervals, were used. Exposure to vitamins E and C was self-reported at baseline in a risk factor questionnaire and/or in a clinical examination. RESULTS: The data set included 5269 individuals. Compared with those not taking vitamin supplements, the age-, sex-, and education-adjusted hazard ratios of CIND, AD, and all-cause dementia were, respectively, 0.77 (95% CI = 0.60-0.98), 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.86), and 0.62 (95% CI = 0.46-0.83) for those taking vitamin E and/or C supplements. Results remained significant in fully adjusted models except for CIND. Similar results were observed when vitamins were analyzed separately. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis suggests that the use of vitamin E and C supplements is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Further investigations are needed to determine their value as a primary prevention strategy. SN - 1542-6270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27708183/Use_of_Vitamin_E_and_C_Supplements_for_the_Prevention_of_Cognitive_Decline_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1060028016673072?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -