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A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health.
J Youth Adolesc. 2017 04; 46(4):854-866.JY

Abstract

Although multiple forms (i.e., physical, threatening, psychological, sexual, and relational abuse) and patterns (i.e., perpetration and victimization) of violence can co-occur, most existing research examines these experiences individually. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate: (1) homogenous subgroups based on victimization and perpetration of multiple forms of teen dating violence; (2) predictors of membership in these subgroups; and (3) mental health consequences associated with membership in each subgroup. Nine hundred eighteen adolescents in the 9th or 10th grade at seven public high schools in Texas participated in the survey (56 % female, White: 30 %, Hispanic: 32 %, African American: 29 %, others: 9 %). A three-step latent class analysis was employed. Five latent teen dating violence classes were identified: (1) nonviolence; (2) emotional/verbal abuse; (3) forced sexual contact; (4) psychological + physical violence; and (5) psychological abuse. Females, African Americans, and youth who had higher acceptance of couple violence scores and whose parents had less education were more likely to members of dating violence classes compared with the nonviolence class. Adolescents who experienced multiple types of dating violence reported greater mental health concerns. Prevention programs may benefit by identifying the homogenous subgroups of teen dating violence and targeting adolescent teen dating violence accordingly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Sciences, University of Missouri, 501 Clark Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA. hjchoi0810@gmail.com.Department of Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78249, USA.Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, University of Texas at Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27709405

Citation

Choi, Hye Jeong, et al. "A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 46, no. 4, 2017, pp. 854-866.
Choi HJ, Weston R, Temple JR. A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health. J Youth Adolesc. 2017;46(4):854-866.
Choi, H. J., Weston, R., & Temple, J. R. (2017). A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 46(4), 854-866. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0570-7
Choi HJ, Weston R, Temple JR. A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health. J Youth Adolesc. 2017;46(4):854-866. PubMed PMID: 27709405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Three-Step Latent Class Analysis to Identify How Different Patterns of Teen Dating Violence and Psychosocial Factors Influence Mental Health. AU - Choi,Hye Jeong, AU - Weston,Rebecca, AU - Temple,Jeff R, Y1 - 2016/10/05/ PY - 2016/06/17/received PY - 2016/09/07/accepted PY - 2016/10/7/pubmed PY - 2018/3/7/medline PY - 2016/10/7/entrez KW - 3-Step latent class analysis KW - Acceptance of couple violence KW - Mental health KW - Teen dating violence SP - 854 EP - 866 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 46 IS - 4 N2 - Although multiple forms (i.e., physical, threatening, psychological, sexual, and relational abuse) and patterns (i.e., perpetration and victimization) of violence can co-occur, most existing research examines these experiences individually. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate: (1) homogenous subgroups based on victimization and perpetration of multiple forms of teen dating violence; (2) predictors of membership in these subgroups; and (3) mental health consequences associated with membership in each subgroup. Nine hundred eighteen adolescents in the 9th or 10th grade at seven public high schools in Texas participated in the survey (56 % female, White: 30 %, Hispanic: 32 %, African American: 29 %, others: 9 %). A three-step latent class analysis was employed. Five latent teen dating violence classes were identified: (1) nonviolence; (2) emotional/verbal abuse; (3) forced sexual contact; (4) psychological + physical violence; and (5) psychological abuse. Females, African Americans, and youth who had higher acceptance of couple violence scores and whose parents had less education were more likely to members of dating violence classes compared with the nonviolence class. Adolescents who experienced multiple types of dating violence reported greater mental health concerns. Prevention programs may benefit by identifying the homogenous subgroups of teen dating violence and targeting adolescent teen dating violence accordingly. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27709405/A_Three_Step_Latent_Class_Analysis_to_Identify_How_Different_Patterns_of_Teen_Dating_Violence_and_Psychosocial_Factors_Influence_Mental_Health_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0570-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -