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Headless spermatozoa in infertile men.
Andrologia. 2017 Oct; 49(8)A

Abstract

Spermatozoa morphology, an important parameter in a semen specimen's potential fertility evaluation, is a significant factor for in vitro fertilisation in assisted reproductive technology. Eleven sterile men with headless spermatozoa, a type of human teratozoospermia, are presented. Their ejaculates' headless spermatozoa percentages were high with rare normal spermatozoa forms. Additionally, abnormal morphology (e.g. round-headed or microcephalic spermatozoa) was also found. Spermatozoa motility was somewhat affected, potentially because of the missing mitochondrial sheath at the sperm tail base. Patients who underwent assisted reproductive technology treatment experienced adverse pregnancy outcomes. Work types and corresponding environments seemed irrelevant, but specific family history may have prompted its genetic origin. Computer-assisted semen analysis systems easily mistake headless spermatozoa as oligozoospermia because of nonrecognition of the loose head. However, morphological testing, especially with an electronic microscope, clearly identifies abnormal spermatozoa. Future exploration requires more methods investigating the frequency and percentage of this morphological abnormality in different populations with varied fertility levels. Such research would estimate the probable correlation of the abnormality with other semen parameters and examine the potential developmental or genetic origins. During clinical work, medical staff should detect these cases, avoid misdiagnosis and provide proper consultation about diagnosis and assisted reproductive technology treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, China.Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.Reproductive Medicine Center, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Xiamen City, Xiamen, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27709648

Citation

Sha, Y-W, et al. "Headless Spermatozoa in Infertile Men." Andrologia, vol. 49, no. 8, 2017.
Sha YW, Ding L, Wu JX, et al. Headless spermatozoa in infertile men. Andrologia. 2017;49(8).
Sha, Y. W., Ding, L., Wu, J. X., Lin, S. B., Wang, X., Ji, Z. Y., & Li, P. (2017). Headless spermatozoa in infertile men. Andrologia, 49(8). https://doi.org/10.1111/and.12716
Sha YW, et al. Headless Spermatozoa in Infertile Men. Andrologia. 2017;49(8) PubMed PMID: 27709648.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Headless spermatozoa in infertile men. AU - Sha,Y-W, AU - Ding,L, AU - Wu,J-X, AU - Lin,S-B, AU - Wang,X, AU - Ji,Z-Y, AU - Li,P, Y1 - 2016/10/06/ PY - 2016/08/04/accepted PY - 2016/10/7/pubmed PY - 2018/5/12/medline PY - 2016/10/7/entrez KW - assisted reproductive technology KW - headless spermatozoa KW - infertility KW - spermatozoa analysis KW - ultrastructural evaluation JF - Andrologia JO - Andrologia VL - 49 IS - 8 N2 - Spermatozoa morphology, an important parameter in a semen specimen's potential fertility evaluation, is a significant factor for in vitro fertilisation in assisted reproductive technology. Eleven sterile men with headless spermatozoa, a type of human teratozoospermia, are presented. Their ejaculates' headless spermatozoa percentages were high with rare normal spermatozoa forms. Additionally, abnormal morphology (e.g. round-headed or microcephalic spermatozoa) was also found. Spermatozoa motility was somewhat affected, potentially because of the missing mitochondrial sheath at the sperm tail base. Patients who underwent assisted reproductive technology treatment experienced adverse pregnancy outcomes. Work types and corresponding environments seemed irrelevant, but specific family history may have prompted its genetic origin. Computer-assisted semen analysis systems easily mistake headless spermatozoa as oligozoospermia because of nonrecognition of the loose head. However, morphological testing, especially with an electronic microscope, clearly identifies abnormal spermatozoa. Future exploration requires more methods investigating the frequency and percentage of this morphological abnormality in different populations with varied fertility levels. Such research would estimate the probable correlation of the abnormality with other semen parameters and examine the potential developmental or genetic origins. During clinical work, medical staff should detect these cases, avoid misdiagnosis and provide proper consultation about diagnosis and assisted reproductive technology treatment. SN - 1439-0272 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27709648/Headless_spermatozoa_in_infertile_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/and.12716 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -