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Relationship between sodium and potassium intake and blood pressure in a sample of overweight adults.
Nutrition 2017; 33:285-290N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sodium and potassium intakes and blood pressure (BP) in a clinical sample.

METHODS

Secondary analysis of baseline data from 328 participants (mean age: 43.6 ± 8 y, mean body mass index [BMI]: 32.4 ± 4.2 kg/m2, mean systolic BP [SBP]/diastolic BP [DBP]: 124.9 ± 14.5/73.3 ± 9.9 mm Hg) of the 12-mo HealthTrack randomized controlled weight loss trial was conducted. Resting BP and 24-h urine sodium and potassium were measured. Dietary intake was evaluated with 4-d food records and self-reported diet histories.

RESULTS

Urinary sodium was positively correlated (Spearman's rho) with SBP (r = 0.176; P = 0.001) and DBP (r = 0.150; P = 0.003). The ratio of sodium to potassium was positively correlated with SBP (r = 0.1; P = 0.035). Urinary sodium (F [4,323] = 20.381; P < 0.0005; adjusted R2 = 0.231) and sodium-to-potassium ratio (F[4,323] = 25.008; P < 0.0005; adjusted R2 = 0.227) significantly predicted SBP after controlling for age, sex, BMI, and hypertension medication use. Dietary sodium and potassium significantly predicted urinary sodium (B = 0.33, t = 4.032, P < 0.01) and potassium (B = 0.67, t = 8.537, P < 0.01) excretion, respectively, after adjustment for energy and BMI. Median dietary sodium intake was 3197 mg/d and median dietary potassium intake was 2886 mg/d. Cereal-based products and dishes were the major contributors (22%) to total sodium intake.

CONCLUSIONS

In the present study, a high dietary sodium intake and high sodium-to-potassium ratio predicted high SBP. This suggests a need to focus dietary advice on reduction of sources of sodium and increasing sources of potassium in weight loss interventions to improve BP control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: rnn954@uowmail.edu.au.School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.Statistical Consulting Service, School of Mathematics and Applied Statistics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27712964

Citation

Ndanuko, Rhoda N., et al. "Relationship Between Sodium and Potassium Intake and Blood Pressure in a Sample of Overweight Adults." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 33, 2017, pp. 285-290.
Ndanuko RN, Tapsell LC, Charlton KE, et al. Relationship between sodium and potassium intake and blood pressure in a sample of overweight adults. Nutrition. 2017;33:285-290.
Ndanuko, R. N., Tapsell, L. C., Charlton, K. E., Neale, E. P., O'Donnell, K. M., & Batterham, M. J. (2017). Relationship between sodium and potassium intake and blood pressure in a sample of overweight adults. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 33, pp. 285-290. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2016.07.011.
Ndanuko RN, et al. Relationship Between Sodium and Potassium Intake and Blood Pressure in a Sample of Overweight Adults. Nutrition. 2017;33:285-290. PubMed PMID: 27712964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between sodium and potassium intake and blood pressure in a sample of overweight adults. AU - Ndanuko,Rhoda N, AU - Tapsell,Linda C, AU - Charlton,Karen E, AU - Neale,Elizabeth P, AU - O'Donnell,Katrina M, AU - Batterham,Marijka J, Y1 - 2016/07/27/ PY - 2016/03/09/received PY - 2016/07/05/revised PY - 2016/07/09/accepted PY - 2016/10/8/pubmed PY - 2017/6/27/medline PY - 2016/10/8/entrez KW - Blood pressure KW - Food sources KW - Obese KW - Potassium KW - Sodium KW - Urinary excretion SP - 285 EP - 290 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 33 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sodium and potassium intakes and blood pressure (BP) in a clinical sample. METHODS: Secondary analysis of baseline data from 328 participants (mean age: 43.6 ± 8 y, mean body mass index [BMI]: 32.4 ± 4.2 kg/m2, mean systolic BP [SBP]/diastolic BP [DBP]: 124.9 ± 14.5/73.3 ± 9.9 mm Hg) of the 12-mo HealthTrack randomized controlled weight loss trial was conducted. Resting BP and 24-h urine sodium and potassium were measured. Dietary intake was evaluated with 4-d food records and self-reported diet histories. RESULTS: Urinary sodium was positively correlated (Spearman's rho) with SBP (r = 0.176; P = 0.001) and DBP (r = 0.150; P = 0.003). The ratio of sodium to potassium was positively correlated with SBP (r = 0.1; P = 0.035). Urinary sodium (F [4,323] = 20.381; P < 0.0005; adjusted R2 = 0.231) and sodium-to-potassium ratio (F[4,323] = 25.008; P < 0.0005; adjusted R2 = 0.227) significantly predicted SBP after controlling for age, sex, BMI, and hypertension medication use. Dietary sodium and potassium significantly predicted urinary sodium (B = 0.33, t = 4.032, P < 0.01) and potassium (B = 0.67, t = 8.537, P < 0.01) excretion, respectively, after adjustment for energy and BMI. Median dietary sodium intake was 3197 mg/d and median dietary potassium intake was 2886 mg/d. Cereal-based products and dishes were the major contributors (22%) to total sodium intake. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, a high dietary sodium intake and high sodium-to-potassium ratio predicted high SBP. This suggests a need to focus dietary advice on reduction of sources of sodium and increasing sources of potassium in weight loss interventions to improve BP control. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27712964/Relationship_between_sodium_and_potassium_intake_and_blood_pressure_in_a_sample_of_overweight_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(16)30137-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -