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Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia with Normal Body Mass Indexes.
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 55(2):717-725.JA

Abstract

Evidence supports an association between vitamin deficiencies and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). If vitamin deficiencies are causative for AD development, they should be detectable during very early stages of AD. Here we investigated nutritional factors among home-living patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia due to AD, compared to healthy controls. Our study included 73 patients with AD (25 with MCI, 48 with dementia) and 63 cognitively intact age-matched controls. All participants underwent cognitive testing, somatic examination, and measurements of vitamins A, B1, B6, folate, B12, C, D, and E, and F2-α-isoprostane. Results are given as mean (SD). MMSE scores were 29.1 (1.0) for healthy controls, 27.4 (1.8) for patients with MCI, and 24.3 (3.2) for patients with dementia. Vitamin concentrations for the these groups, respectively, were as follows: B1 (nmol/l), 157 (29), 161 (35), and 161 (32); B6 (nmol/l), 57 (63), 71 (104), and 58 (44); folate (mmol/l), 23 (9), 26 (10), and 23 (11); B12 (pmol/l), 407 (159), 427 (116), and 397 (204); C (μmol/l), 63 (18), 61 (16), and 63 (29); A (μmol/l), 2.3 (0.6), 2.2 (0.5), and 2.3 (0.5); E (μmol/l), 36 (6.3), 36 (6.9), and 36 (8.2); 25-OH vitamin D (nmol/l), 65 (18), 61 (19), and 65 (20); and 8-iso-PGFα (pg/ml), 64 (27); 60 (19), and 66 (51). These concentrations did not significantly differ (p≤0.05) between the three groups. Our results do not support the hypothesis that vitamin deficiencies play a causative role in the development of early cognitive impairment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo, Norway. University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway.University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway. Nutritional Laboratory, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Aker, Oslo, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27716664

Citation

Ulstein, Ingun, and Thomas Bøhmer. "Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia With Normal Body Mass Indexes." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 55, no. 2, 2017, pp. 717-725.
Ulstein I, Bøhmer T. Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia with Normal Body Mass Indexes. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;55(2):717-725.
Ulstein, I., & Bøhmer, T. (2017). Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia with Normal Body Mass Indexes. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 55(2), 717-725.
Ulstein I, Bøhmer T. Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia With Normal Body Mass Indexes. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;55(2):717-725. PubMed PMID: 27716664.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia with Normal Body Mass Indexes. AU - Ulstein,Ingun, AU - Bøhmer,Thomas, PY - 2016/11/2/pubmed PY - 2018/2/23/medline PY - 2016/10/8/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - vitamin deficiencies SP - 717 EP - 725 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - Evidence supports an association between vitamin deficiencies and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). If vitamin deficiencies are causative for AD development, they should be detectable during very early stages of AD. Here we investigated nutritional factors among home-living patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia due to AD, compared to healthy controls. Our study included 73 patients with AD (25 with MCI, 48 with dementia) and 63 cognitively intact age-matched controls. All participants underwent cognitive testing, somatic examination, and measurements of vitamins A, B1, B6, folate, B12, C, D, and E, and F2-α-isoprostane. Results are given as mean (SD). MMSE scores were 29.1 (1.0) for healthy controls, 27.4 (1.8) for patients with MCI, and 24.3 (3.2) for patients with dementia. Vitamin concentrations for the these groups, respectively, were as follows: B1 (nmol/l), 157 (29), 161 (35), and 161 (32); B6 (nmol/l), 57 (63), 71 (104), and 58 (44); folate (mmol/l), 23 (9), 26 (10), and 23 (11); B12 (pmol/l), 407 (159), 427 (116), and 397 (204); C (μmol/l), 63 (18), 61 (16), and 63 (29); A (μmol/l), 2.3 (0.6), 2.2 (0.5), and 2.3 (0.5); E (μmol/l), 36 (6.3), 36 (6.9), and 36 (8.2); 25-OH vitamin D (nmol/l), 65 (18), 61 (19), and 65 (20); and 8-iso-PGFα (pg/ml), 64 (27); 60 (19), and 66 (51). These concentrations did not significantly differ (p≤0.05) between the three groups. Our results do not support the hypothesis that vitamin deficiencies play a causative role in the development of early cognitive impairment. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27716664/Normal_Vitamin_Levels_and_Nutritional_Indices_in_Alzheimer's_Disease_Patients_with_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_or_Dementia_with_Normal_Body_Mass_Indexes_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-160393 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -