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Differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in securely versus insecurely attached infants.
Behav Brain Res. 2017 05 15; 325(Pt B):147-155.BB

Abstract

In this study we examined whether securely versus insecurely attached infants use different regulatory behaviors in absence of their mother and whether these regulatory behaviors are differentially associated with physiological stress responses in secure versus insecure infants. Participants were 193 one-year-olds and their mothers. During three 3-min episodes of separation from the mother in the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) [1], the following infant regulatory behaviors were observed: crying, fussing, self-soothing, manipulation of toys, and manipulation of the door. Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline and 25, 40, and 60min after the SSP to measure reactivity and recovery. Additionally, infants were classified as securely or insecurely attached to their mothers. During the mother's absence, secure infants engaged more in manipulation of the door than insecure infants. Furthermore, in insecure (but not secure) infants less fussing was associated with higher cortisol reactivity, while in secure (but not insecure) infants more self-soothing was associated with higher cortisol reactivity. In total, 29% of the variance in cortisol reactivity was explained by infant regulatory behaviors in the mother's absence. Cortisol recovery was not predicted by infant regulatory behaviors in the mother's absence. To conclude, the results show differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in secure versus insecure infants. This might indicate that secure and insecure infants apply different behavioral regulatory strategies when physiologically stressed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Developmental Psychology, Behavioral Science Institute, Radboud University, The Netherlands. Electronic address: r.beijers@psych.ru.nl.Department of Developmental Psychology, Behavioral Science Institute, Radboud University, The Netherlands.Department of Developmental Psychology, Behavioral Science Institute, Radboud University, The Netherlands.Department of Developmental Psychology, Behavioral Science Institute, Radboud University, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27717814

Citation

Beijers, Roseriet, et al. "Differential Associations Between Behavioral and Cortisol Responses to a Stressor in Securely Versus Insecurely Attached Infants." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 325, no. Pt B, 2017, pp. 147-155.
Beijers R, Riksen-Walraven M, Sebesta K, et al. Differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in securely versus insecurely attached infants. Behav Brain Res. 2017;325(Pt B):147-155.
Beijers, R., Riksen-Walraven, M., Sebesta, K., & de Weerth, C. (2017). Differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in securely versus insecurely attached infants. Behavioural Brain Research, 325(Pt B), 147-155. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2016.10.008
Beijers R, et al. Differential Associations Between Behavioral and Cortisol Responses to a Stressor in Securely Versus Insecurely Attached Infants. Behav Brain Res. 2017 05 15;325(Pt B):147-155. PubMed PMID: 27717814.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in securely versus insecurely attached infants. AU - Beijers,Roseriet, AU - Riksen-Walraven,Marianne, AU - Sebesta,Katharina, AU - de Weerth,Carolina, Y1 - 2016/10/04/ PY - 2016/07/28/received PY - 2016/09/15/revised PY - 2016/10/04/accepted PY - 2016/10/9/pubmed PY - 2018/3/7/medline PY - 2016/10/9/entrez KW - Attachment KW - Behavior KW - Cortisol KW - HPA-axis KW - Regulation KW - Stress SP - 147 EP - 155 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav Brain Res VL - 325 IS - Pt B N2 - In this study we examined whether securely versus insecurely attached infants use different regulatory behaviors in absence of their mother and whether these regulatory behaviors are differentially associated with physiological stress responses in secure versus insecure infants. Participants were 193 one-year-olds and their mothers. During three 3-min episodes of separation from the mother in the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) [1], the following infant regulatory behaviors were observed: crying, fussing, self-soothing, manipulation of toys, and manipulation of the door. Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline and 25, 40, and 60min after the SSP to measure reactivity and recovery. Additionally, infants were classified as securely or insecurely attached to their mothers. During the mother's absence, secure infants engaged more in manipulation of the door than insecure infants. Furthermore, in insecure (but not secure) infants less fussing was associated with higher cortisol reactivity, while in secure (but not insecure) infants more self-soothing was associated with higher cortisol reactivity. In total, 29% of the variance in cortisol reactivity was explained by infant regulatory behaviors in the mother's absence. Cortisol recovery was not predicted by infant regulatory behaviors in the mother's absence. To conclude, the results show differential associations between behavioral and cortisol responses to a stressor in secure versus insecure infants. This might indicate that secure and insecure infants apply different behavioral regulatory strategies when physiologically stressed. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27717814/Differential_associations_between_behavioral_and_cortisol_responses_to_a_stressor_in_securely_versus_insecurely_attached_infants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(16)30768-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -