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Diet misreporting can be corrected: confirmation of the association between energy intake and fat-free mass in adolescents.
Br J Nutr. 2016 Oct; 116(8):1425-1436.BJ

Abstract

Subjective energy intake (sEI) is often misreported, providing unreliable estimates of energy consumed. Therefore, relating sEI data to health outcomes is difficult. Recently, Börnhorst et al. compared various methods to correct sEI-based energy intake estimates. They criticised approaches that categorise participants as under-reporters, plausible reporters and over-reporters based on the sEI:total energy expenditure (TEE) ratio, and thereafter use these categories as statistical covariates or exclusion criteria. Instead, they recommended using external predictors of sEI misreporting as statistical covariates. We sought to confirm and extend these findings. Using a sample of 190 adolescent boys (mean age=14), we demonstrated that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-measured fat-free mass is strongly associated with objective energy intake data (onsite weighted breakfast), but the association with sEI (previous 3-d dietary interview) is weak. Comparing sEI with TEE revealed that sEI was mostly under-reported (74 %). Interestingly, statistically controlling for dietary reporting groups or restricting samples to plausible reporters created a stronger-than-expected association between fat-free mass and sEI. However, the association was an artifact caused by selection bias - that is, data re-sampling and simulations showed that these methods overestimated the effect size because fat-free mass was related to sEI both directly and indirectly via TEE. A more realistic association between sEI and fat-free mass was obtained when the model included common predictors of misreporting (e.g. BMI, restraint). To conclude, restricting sEI data only to plausible reporters can cause selection bias and inflated associations in later analyses. Therefore, we further support statistically correcting sEI data in nutritional analyses. The script for running simulations is provided.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Institute of Psychology,University of Tartu,Näituse 2,50410,Tartu,Estonia.1Institute of Psychology,University of Tartu,Näituse 2,50410,Tartu,Estonia.4Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences,University of Tartu,Jakobi 5,51014,Tartu,Estonia.4Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences,University of Tartu,Jakobi 5,51014,Tartu,Estonia.4Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences,University of Tartu,Jakobi 5,51014,Tartu,Estonia.4Faculty of Exercise and Sport Sciences,University of Tartu,Jakobi 5,51014,Tartu,Estonia.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27725008

Citation

Vainik, Uku, et al. "Diet Misreporting Can Be Corrected: Confirmation of the Association Between Energy Intake and Fat-free Mass in Adolescents." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 116, no. 8, 2016, pp. 1425-1436.
Vainik U, Konstabel K, Lätt E, et al. Diet misreporting can be corrected: confirmation of the association between energy intake and fat-free mass in adolescents. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(8):1425-1436.
Vainik, U., Konstabel, K., Lätt, E., Mäestu, J., Purge, P., & Jürimäe, J. (2016). Diet misreporting can be corrected: confirmation of the association between energy intake and fat-free mass in adolescents. The British Journal of Nutrition, 116(8), 1425-1436.
Vainik U, et al. Diet Misreporting Can Be Corrected: Confirmation of the Association Between Energy Intake and Fat-free Mass in Adolescents. Br J Nutr. 2016;116(8):1425-1436. PubMed PMID: 27725008.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet misreporting can be corrected: confirmation of the association between energy intake and fat-free mass in adolescents. AU - Vainik,Uku, AU - Konstabel,Kenn, AU - Lätt,Evelin, AU - Mäestu,Jarek, AU - Purge,Priit, AU - Jürimäe,Jaak, Y1 - 2016/10/11/ PY - 2016/10/22/pubmed PY - 2017/5/20/medline PY - 2016/10/12/entrez KW - EB% energy balance percentage KW - PR plausible reporters KW - TEE total energy expenditure KW - UR under-reporters KW - oEI objective energy intake KW - sEI subjective energy intake KW - Dietary interviews KW - Objective energy intake KW - Plausible reporting KW - Selection bias KW - Subjective energy intake KW - Under-reporting SP - 1425 EP - 1436 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 116 IS - 8 N2 - Subjective energy intake (sEI) is often misreported, providing unreliable estimates of energy consumed. Therefore, relating sEI data to health outcomes is difficult. Recently, Börnhorst et al. compared various methods to correct sEI-based energy intake estimates. They criticised approaches that categorise participants as under-reporters, plausible reporters and over-reporters based on the sEI:total energy expenditure (TEE) ratio, and thereafter use these categories as statistical covariates or exclusion criteria. Instead, they recommended using external predictors of sEI misreporting as statistical covariates. We sought to confirm and extend these findings. Using a sample of 190 adolescent boys (mean age=14), we demonstrated that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-measured fat-free mass is strongly associated with objective energy intake data (onsite weighted breakfast), but the association with sEI (previous 3-d dietary interview) is weak. Comparing sEI with TEE revealed that sEI was mostly under-reported (74 %). Interestingly, statistically controlling for dietary reporting groups or restricting samples to plausible reporters created a stronger-than-expected association between fat-free mass and sEI. However, the association was an artifact caused by selection bias - that is, data re-sampling and simulations showed that these methods overestimated the effect size because fat-free mass was related to sEI both directly and indirectly via TEE. A more realistic association between sEI and fat-free mass was obtained when the model included common predictors of misreporting (e.g. BMI, restraint). To conclude, restricting sEI data only to plausible reporters can cause selection bias and inflated associations in later analyses. Therefore, we further support statistically correcting sEI data in nutritional analyses. The script for running simulations is provided. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27725008/Diet_misreporting_can_be_corrected:_confirmation_of_the_association_between_energy_intake_and_fat_free_mass_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114516003317/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -