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European derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonisation of New Zealand vineyards aided by humans.
FEMS Yeast Res 2016; 16(7)FY

Abstract

Humans have acted as vectors for species and expanded their ranges since at least the dawn of agriculture. While relatively well characterised for macrofauna and macroflora, the extent and dynamics of human-aided microbial dispersal is poorly described. We studied the role which humans have played in manipulating the distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the world's most important microbes, using whole genome sequencing. We include 52 strains representative of the diversity in New Zealand to the global set of genomes for this species. Phylogenomic approaches show an exclusively European origin of the New Zealand population, with a minimum of 10 founder events mostly taking place over the last 1000 years. Our results show that humans have expanded the range of S. cerevisiae and transported it to New Zealand where it was not previously present, where it has now become established in vineyards, but radiation to native forests appears limited.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand The School of Life Sciences, The University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7DL, UK m.goddard@auckland.ac.nz.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27744274

Citation

Gayevskiy, Velimir, et al. "European Derived Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Colonisation of New Zealand Vineyards Aided By Humans." FEMS Yeast Research, vol. 16, no. 7, 2016.
Gayevskiy V, Lee S, Goddard MR. European derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonisation of New Zealand vineyards aided by humans. FEMS Yeast Res. 2016;16(7).
Gayevskiy, V., Lee, S., & Goddard, M. R. (2016). European derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonisation of New Zealand vineyards aided by humans. FEMS Yeast Research, 16(7).
Gayevskiy V, Lee S, Goddard MR. European Derived Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Colonisation of New Zealand Vineyards Aided By Humans. FEMS Yeast Res. 2016;16(7) PubMed PMID: 27744274.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - European derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonisation of New Zealand vineyards aided by humans. AU - Gayevskiy,Velimir, AU - Lee,Soon, AU - Goddard,Matthew R, Y1 - 2016/10/15/ PY - 2016/10/14/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2017/8/3/medline PY - 2016/10/17/entrez KW - Saccharomyces cerevisiae KW - genomics KW - phylogenomics KW - population genetics KW - yeast JF - FEMS yeast research JO - FEMS Yeast Res. VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - Humans have acted as vectors for species and expanded their ranges since at least the dawn of agriculture. While relatively well characterised for macrofauna and macroflora, the extent and dynamics of human-aided microbial dispersal is poorly described. We studied the role which humans have played in manipulating the distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the world's most important microbes, using whole genome sequencing. We include 52 strains representative of the diversity in New Zealand to the global set of genomes for this species. Phylogenomic approaches show an exclusively European origin of the New Zealand population, with a minimum of 10 founder events mostly taking place over the last 1000 years. Our results show that humans have expanded the range of S. cerevisiae and transported it to New Zealand where it was not previously present, where it has now become established in vineyards, but radiation to native forests appears limited. SN - 1567-1364 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27744274/European_derived_Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_colonisation_of_New_Zealand_vineyards_aided_by_humans L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsyr/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/femsyr/fow091 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -