Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Positive vitreous pressure: Pathophysiology, complications, prevention, and management.
Surv Ophthalmol. 2017 Mar - Apr; 62(2):127-133.SO

Abstract

Positive vitreous pressure occurs during anterior segment intraocular surgery associated with acute hypotony and is characterized by forward displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm with shallowing of the anterior chamber resistant to reformation, repeated iris prolapse, and, in severe cases, zonular rupture and vitreous or lens prolapse that can lead to a cascade of intraoperative complications. Positive vitreous pressure is particularly common during penetrating keratoplasty, conventional nuclear expression cataract extraction, and repair of anterior open-globe injury. Hypotony resulting from aqueous loss leads to elevated vitreous pressure from 3 possible causes: external scleral compression, acute intraocular intumescence, or rarely acutely increased vitreous volume. Understanding the pathophysiology of positive vitreous pressure helps in its prevention and management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals and School of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: aris_c@web.de.Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals and School of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals and School of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27751822

Citation

Chronopoulos, Argyrios, et al. "Positive Vitreous Pressure: Pathophysiology, Complications, Prevention, and Management." Survey of Ophthalmology, vol. 62, no. 2, 2017, pp. 127-133.
Chronopoulos A, Thumann G, Schutz J. Positive vitreous pressure: Pathophysiology, complications, prevention, and management. Surv Ophthalmol. 2017;62(2):127-133.
Chronopoulos, A., Thumann, G., & Schutz, J. (2017). Positive vitreous pressure: Pathophysiology, complications, prevention, and management. Survey of Ophthalmology, 62(2), 127-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.10.002
Chronopoulos A, Thumann G, Schutz J. Positive Vitreous Pressure: Pathophysiology, Complications, Prevention, and Management. Surv Ophthalmol. 2017 Mar - Apr;62(2):127-133. PubMed PMID: 27751822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Positive vitreous pressure: Pathophysiology, complications, prevention, and management. AU - Chronopoulos,Argyrios, AU - Thumann,Gabriele, AU - Schutz,James, Y1 - 2016/10/15/ PY - 2016/06/12/received PY - 2016/10/09/revised PY - 2016/10/10/accepted PY - 2016/10/19/pubmed PY - 2017/5/4/medline PY - 2016/10/19/entrez KW - akinesia KW - choroidal detachment KW - choroidal effusion KW - choroidal hemorrhage KW - open intraocular surgery KW - positive vitreous pressure KW - vitreous pressure SP - 127 EP - 133 JF - Survey of ophthalmology JO - Surv Ophthalmol VL - 62 IS - 2 N2 - Positive vitreous pressure occurs during anterior segment intraocular surgery associated with acute hypotony and is characterized by forward displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm with shallowing of the anterior chamber resistant to reformation, repeated iris prolapse, and, in severe cases, zonular rupture and vitreous or lens prolapse that can lead to a cascade of intraoperative complications. Positive vitreous pressure is particularly common during penetrating keratoplasty, conventional nuclear expression cataract extraction, and repair of anterior open-globe injury. Hypotony resulting from aqueous loss leads to elevated vitreous pressure from 3 possible causes: external scleral compression, acute intraocular intumescence, or rarely acutely increased vitreous volume. Understanding the pathophysiology of positive vitreous pressure helps in its prevention and management. SN - 1879-3304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27751822/Positive_vitreous_pressure:_Pathophysiology,_complications,_prevention,_and_management L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0039-6257(16)30100-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -