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Interhemispheric connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A near-infrared spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging study.
Neuroimage Clin. 2016; 12:666-672.NC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Aim of the present study was to investigate potential impairment of non-motor areas in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In particular, we evaluated whether homotopic resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of non-motor associated cortical areas correlates with clinical parameters and disease-specific degeneration of the corpus callosum (CC) in ALS.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Interhemispheric homotopic rs-FC was assessed in 31 patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs) for 8 cortical sites, from prefrontal to occipital cortex, using NIRS. DTI was performed in a subgroup of 21 patients. All patients were evaluated for cognitive dysfunction in the executive, memory, and visuospatial domains.

RESULTS

ALS patients displayed an altered spatial pattern of correlation between homotopic rs-FC values when compared to HCs (p = 0.000013). In patients without executive dysfunction a strong correlation existed between the rate of motor decline and homotopic rs-FC of the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) (ρ = - 0.85, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, antero-temporal homotopic rs-FC correlated with fractional anisotropy in the central corpus callosum (CC), corticospinal tracts (CSTs), and forceps minor as determined by DTI (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The present study further supports involvement of non-motor areas in ALS. Our results render homotopic rs-FC as assessed by NIRS a potential clinical marker for disease progression rate in ALS patients without executive dysfunction and a potential anatomical marker for ALS-specific degeneration of the CC and CSTs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestrasse 6, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestrasse 6, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestrasse 6, 39118 Magdeburg, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.Department of Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.Department of Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.Department of Neurology, Luebeck University, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Luebeck, Germany.Department of Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; NEUROLOGY MOVES, Bismarckstrasse 45-47, 10627 Berlin, Germany.Clinic for Neurology and Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Leipziger Strasse 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27761397

Citation

Kopitzki, Klaus, et al. "Interhemispheric Connectivity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Near-infrared Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study." NeuroImage. Clinical, vol. 12, 2016, pp. 666-672.
Kopitzki K, Oldag A, Sweeney-Reed CM, et al. Interhemispheric connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A near-infrared spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging study. Neuroimage Clin. 2016;12:666-672.
Kopitzki, K., Oldag, A., Sweeney-Reed, C. M., Machts, J., Veit, M., Kaufmann, J., Hinrichs, H., Heinze, H. J., Kollewe, K., Petri, S., Mohammadi, B., Dengler, R., Kupsch, A. R., & Vielhaber, S. (2016). Interhemispheric connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A near-infrared spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging study. NeuroImage. Clinical, 12, 666-672.
Kopitzki K, et al. Interhemispheric Connectivity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Near-infrared Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study. Neuroimage Clin. 2016;12:666-672. PubMed PMID: 27761397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interhemispheric connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A near-infrared spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging study. AU - Kopitzki,Klaus, AU - Oldag,Andreas, AU - Sweeney-Reed,Catherine M, AU - Machts,Judith, AU - Veit,Maria, AU - Kaufmann,Jörn, AU - Hinrichs,Hermann, AU - Heinze,Hans-Jochen, AU - Kollewe,Katja, AU - Petri,Susanne, AU - Mohammadi,Bahram, AU - Dengler,Reinhard, AU - Kupsch,Andreas R, AU - Vielhaber,Stefan, Y1 - 2016/09/29/ PY - 2016/05/27/received PY - 2016/09/27/revised PY - 2016/09/28/accepted PY - 2016/10/21/pubmed PY - 2017/11/3/medline PY - 2016/10/21/entrez KW - AC, anterior commissure KW - ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis KW - ALS-EX, ALS with executive impairment KW - ALS-NECI, ALS with non-executive cognitive impairment KW - ALSFRS-R, revised ALS functional rating scale KW - ATL, anterior temporal lobe KW - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis KW - CC, corpus callosum KW - CST, corticospinal tract KW - Corpus callosum KW - DD, disease duration KW - DPR, disease progression rate KW - DTI, diffusion tensor imaging KW - Diffusion tensor imaging KW - FA, fractional anisotropy KW - FTD, frontotemporal dementia KW - HC, healthy control KW - Hb, hemoglobin KW - Interhemispheric connectivity KW - NIRS, near-infrared spectroscopy KW - Near-infrared spectroscopy KW - TBSS, tract based spatial statistics KW - WM, white matter KW - fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging KW - pALS, pure ALS no cognitive impairment KW - rs-FC, resting-state functional connectivity KW - rs-fNIRS, resting-state functional NIRS SP - 666 EP - 672 JF - NeuroImage. Clinical JO - Neuroimage Clin VL - 12 N2 - PURPOSE: Aim of the present study was to investigate potential impairment of non-motor areas in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In particular, we evaluated whether homotopic resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) of non-motor associated cortical areas correlates with clinical parameters and disease-specific degeneration of the corpus callosum (CC) in ALS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Interhemispheric homotopic rs-FC was assessed in 31 patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs) for 8 cortical sites, from prefrontal to occipital cortex, using NIRS. DTI was performed in a subgroup of 21 patients. All patients were evaluated for cognitive dysfunction in the executive, memory, and visuospatial domains. RESULTS: ALS patients displayed an altered spatial pattern of correlation between homotopic rs-FC values when compared to HCs (p = 0.000013). In patients without executive dysfunction a strong correlation existed between the rate of motor decline and homotopic rs-FC of the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) (ρ = - 0.85, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, antero-temporal homotopic rs-FC correlated with fractional anisotropy in the central corpus callosum (CC), corticospinal tracts (CSTs), and forceps minor as determined by DTI (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present study further supports involvement of non-motor areas in ALS. Our results render homotopic rs-FC as assessed by NIRS a potential clinical marker for disease progression rate in ALS patients without executive dysfunction and a potential anatomical marker for ALS-specific degeneration of the CC and CSTs. SN - 2213-1582 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27761397/Interhemispheric_connectivity_in_amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis:_A_near_infrared_spectroscopy_and_diffusion_tensor_imaging_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2213-1582(16)30178-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -