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Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dairy products are major components of daily diet and the association between consumption of dairy products and public health issues has captured great attention. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk.

METHODS

After a literature search in PubMed and EMBASE, 11 population-based cohort studies involving 778,929 individuals were considered eligible and included in the analyses. Data were extracted and the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk was estimated by calculating pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses based on regions, genders and dairy types were performed as well. Potential dose-response relationship was further explored by adopting the generalized least squares (GLST) method.

RESULTS

Total dairy products intake was not associated with all cancer mortality risk, with the pooled RR of 0.99 (95 % CI 0.92-1.07, p = 0.893). Subgroup analyses showed that the pooled RRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.92-1.03, p = 0.314) for milk, 0.88 (95 % CI 0.71-1.10, p = 0.271) for yogurt, 1.23 (95 % CI 0.94-1.61, p = 0.127) for cheese and 1.13 (95 % CI 0.89-1.44, p = 0.317) for butter in male and female, however the pooled RR was 1.50 (95 % CI 1.03-2.17, p = 0.032) for whole milk in male, which was limited to prostate cancer. Further dose-response analyses were performed and we found that increase of whole milk (serving/day) induced elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly, with the RR of 1.43 (95 % CI 1.13-1.81, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS

Total dairy products intake have no significant impact on increased all cancer mortality risk, while low total dairy intake even reduced relative risk based on the non-linear model. However, whole milk intake in men contributed to elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly. Furthermore, a linear dose-response relationship existed between increase of whole milk intake and increase of prostate cancer mortality risk.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

    ,

    Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

    ,

    Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

    ,

    The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China.

    ,

    Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China. dxia@zju.edu.cn.

    Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China. georgewuer@126.com. Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China. georgewuer@126.com.

    Source

    Nutrition journal 15:1 2016 10 21 pg 91

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Animals
    Cheese
    Cohort Studies
    Dairy Products
    Diet
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Milk
    Neoplasms
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Yogurt

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27765039

    Citation

    Lu, Wei, et al. "Dairy Products Intake and Cancer Mortality Risk: a Meta-analysis of 11 Population-based Cohort Studies." Nutrition Journal, vol. 15, no. 1, 2016, p. 91.
    Lu W, Chen H, Niu Y, et al. Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies. Nutr J. 2016;15(1):91.
    Lu, W., Chen, H., Niu, Y., Wu, H., Xia, D., & Wu, Y. (2016). Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies. Nutrition Journal, 15(1), p. 91.
    Lu W, et al. Dairy Products Intake and Cancer Mortality Risk: a Meta-analysis of 11 Population-based Cohort Studies. Nutr J. 2016 10 21;15(1):91. PubMed PMID: 27765039.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk: a meta-analysis of 11 population-based cohort studies. AU - Lu,Wei, AU - Chen,Hanwen, AU - Niu,Yuequn, AU - Wu,Han, AU - Xia,Dajing, AU - Wu,Yihua, Y1 - 2016/10/21/ PY - 2016/05/20/received PY - 2016/10/12/accepted PY - 2016/10/22/pubmed PY - 2017/10/11/medline PY - 2016/10/22/entrez KW - Cancer KW - Dairy products KW - Dose–response KW - Meta-analysis KW - Mortality risk SP - 91 EP - 91 JF - Nutrition journal JO - Nutr J VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dairy products are major components of daily diet and the association between consumption of dairy products and public health issues has captured great attention. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk. METHODS: After a literature search in PubMed and EMBASE, 11 population-based cohort studies involving 778,929 individuals were considered eligible and included in the analyses. Data were extracted and the association between dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk was estimated by calculating pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses based on regions, genders and dairy types were performed as well. Potential dose-response relationship was further explored by adopting the generalized least squares (GLST) method. RESULTS: Total dairy products intake was not associated with all cancer mortality risk, with the pooled RR of 0.99 (95 % CI 0.92-1.07, p = 0.893). Subgroup analyses showed that the pooled RRs were 0.97 (95 % CI 0.92-1.03, p = 0.314) for milk, 0.88 (95 % CI 0.71-1.10, p = 0.271) for yogurt, 1.23 (95 % CI 0.94-1.61, p = 0.127) for cheese and 1.13 (95 % CI 0.89-1.44, p = 0.317) for butter in male and female, however the pooled RR was 1.50 (95 % CI 1.03-2.17, p = 0.032) for whole milk in male, which was limited to prostate cancer. Further dose-response analyses were performed and we found that increase of whole milk (serving/day) induced elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly, with the RR of 1.43 (95 % CI 1.13-1.81, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Total dairy products intake have no significant impact on increased all cancer mortality risk, while low total dairy intake even reduced relative risk based on the non-linear model. However, whole milk intake in men contributed to elevated prostate cancer mortality risk significantly. Furthermore, a linear dose-response relationship existed between increase of whole milk intake and increase of prostate cancer mortality risk. SN - 1475-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27765039/Dairy_products_intake_and_cancer_mortality_risk:_a_meta_analysis_of_11_population_based_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-016-0210-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -