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Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns.
Microbiome 2016; 4(1):57M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diet has a recognized effect in shaping gut microbiota. Many studies link an increase in Prevotella to high-fibre diet, while Bacteroides abundance is usually associated with the consumption of animal fat and protein-rich diets. Nevertheless, closely related species and strains may harbour different genetic pools; therefore, further studies should aim to understand whether species of the same genus are consistently linked to dietary patterns or equally responsive to diet variations. Here, we used oligotyping of 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to exploit the diversity within Prevotella and Bacteroides genera in faecal samples of omnivore and non-omnivore subjects from a previously studied cohort.

RESULTS

A great heterogeneity was found in oligotype composition. Nevertheless, different oligotypes within the same genus showed distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. We found that some Prevotella oligotypes are significantly associated with the plant-based diet but some are associated with animal-based nutrients, and the same applies to Bacteroides. Therefore, an indiscriminate association of Bacteroidetes genera with specific dietary patterns may lead to an oversimplified vision that does not take into account sub-genus diversity and the different possible responses to dietary components.

CONCLUSIONS

We demonstrated that Prevotella and Bacteroides oligotypes show distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. These results substantiate a current oversimplification of diet-dependent microbe-host associations and highlighted that sub-genus differences must be taken into account when planning gut microbiota modulation for health benefits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Agricultural Sciences, Division of Microbiology, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055, Portici, Italy.Department of Food Science, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 48/A, 43124, Parma, Italy.Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, viale Fanin 44, 40127, Bologna, Italy. Inter-Departmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Piazza Goidanich 60, 47521, Cesena, Italy.Department of Soil, Plant and Food Science, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Via Amendola 165/a, 70126, Bari, Italy.Department of Agricultural Sciences, Division of Microbiology, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055, Portici, Italy. ercolini@unina.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27769291

Citation

De Filippis, Francesca, et al. "Unusual Sub-genus Associations of Faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides With Specific Dietary Patterns." Microbiome, vol. 4, no. 1, 2016, p. 57.
De Filippis F, Pellegrini N, Laghi L, et al. Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns. Microbiome. 2016;4(1):57.
De Filippis, F., Pellegrini, N., Laghi, L., Gobbetti, M., & Ercolini, D. (2016). Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns. Microbiome, 4(1), p. 57.
De Filippis F, et al. Unusual Sub-genus Associations of Faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides With Specific Dietary Patterns. Microbiome. 2016 10 21;4(1):57. PubMed PMID: 27769291.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns. AU - De Filippis,Francesca, AU - Pellegrini,Nicoletta, AU - Laghi,Luca, AU - Gobbetti,Marco, AU - Ercolini,Danilo, Y1 - 2016/10/21/ PY - 2016/06/30/received PY - 2016/10/12/accepted PY - 2016/10/23/pubmed PY - 2017/7/7/medline PY - 2016/10/23/entrez KW - Gut microbiota KW - Oligotyping KW - Omnivore diet KW - Plant-based diet SP - 57 EP - 57 JF - Microbiome JO - Microbiome VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diet has a recognized effect in shaping gut microbiota. Many studies link an increase in Prevotella to high-fibre diet, while Bacteroides abundance is usually associated with the consumption of animal fat and protein-rich diets. Nevertheless, closely related species and strains may harbour different genetic pools; therefore, further studies should aim to understand whether species of the same genus are consistently linked to dietary patterns or equally responsive to diet variations. Here, we used oligotyping of 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to exploit the diversity within Prevotella and Bacteroides genera in faecal samples of omnivore and non-omnivore subjects from a previously studied cohort. RESULTS: A great heterogeneity was found in oligotype composition. Nevertheless, different oligotypes within the same genus showed distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. We found that some Prevotella oligotypes are significantly associated with the plant-based diet but some are associated with animal-based nutrients, and the same applies to Bacteroides. Therefore, an indiscriminate association of Bacteroidetes genera with specific dietary patterns may lead to an oversimplified vision that does not take into account sub-genus diversity and the different possible responses to dietary components. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that Prevotella and Bacteroides oligotypes show distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. These results substantiate a current oversimplification of diet-dependent microbe-host associations and highlighted that sub-genus differences must be taken into account when planning gut microbiota modulation for health benefits. SN - 2049-2618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27769291/Unusual_sub_genus_associations_of_faecal_Prevotella_and_Bacteroides_with_specific_dietary_patterns_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -