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Dietary fat and carbohydrate quality have independent effects on postprandial glucose and lipid responses.
Eur J Nutr 2018; 57(1):243-250EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

The magnitude of postprandial lipemia is influenced not only by the amount but also the type of fat and carbohydrate consumed. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in postprandial glucose and lipid responses after a mixed meal containing low- or high-glycemic-index (GI) carbohydrate and three different types of fat varying in the degree of saturation in healthy subjects.

METHODS

A randomized, controlled, single-blinded crossover study was conducted in 20 healthy Chinese men. Subjects consumed in random order six experimental isocaloric meals that differed in carbohydrate and fat quality, and contained 40 g of either saturated fat (SFA, butter), monounsaturated fat (MUFA, olive oil) or polyunsaturated fat (PUFA, grapeseed oil), and 50 g of either low-GI (basmati rice) or high-GI (jasmine rice) carbohydrate. Glucose, insulin, c-peptide, triglycerides (TG) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were measured over 4 h.

RESULTS

For all substrates evaluated, there were no significant interactions between fat and carbohydrate. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for TG was significantly lower after the SFA and PUFA meals compared with the MUFA meal, irrespective of GI. No significant difference was found for NEFA iAUC in all treatments. Glucose, insulin and c-peptide iAUCs were significantly lower after ingestion of low-GI than high-GI meals, independent of the type of fat.

CONCLUSIONS

A carbohydrate-rich meal (of either low or high GI) that contains butter or grapeseed oil results in lower postprandial TG concentrations relative to olive oil in healthy Chinese males. Glucose, insulin and c-peptide responses, however, are directly dependent on the GI of the meal and not on the degree of saturation of dietary fat. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02585427.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science and Technology and Research (A*STAR), 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore, 117599, Singapore.Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science and Technology and Research (A*STAR), 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore, 117599, Singapore.Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science and Technology and Research (A*STAR), 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore, 117599, Singapore.Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science and Technology and Research (A*STAR), 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore, 117599, Singapore. Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117597, Singapore.Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science and Technology and Research (A*STAR), 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore, 117599, Singapore. jeya_henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg. Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117599, Singapore. jeya_henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27770188

Citation

Sun, Lijuan, et al. "Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate Quality Have Independent Effects On Postprandial Glucose and Lipid Responses." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 1, 2018, pp. 243-250.
Sun L, Tan KWJ, Lim JZ, et al. Dietary fat and carbohydrate quality have independent effects on postprandial glucose and lipid responses. Eur J Nutr. 2018;57(1):243-250.
Sun, L., Tan, K. W. J., Lim, J. Z., Magkos, F., & Henry, C. J. (2018). Dietary fat and carbohydrate quality have independent effects on postprandial glucose and lipid responses. European Journal of Nutrition, 57(1), pp. 243-250. doi:10.1007/s00394-016-1313-y.
Sun L, et al. Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate Quality Have Independent Effects On Postprandial Glucose and Lipid Responses. Eur J Nutr. 2018;57(1):243-250. PubMed PMID: 27770188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat and carbohydrate quality have independent effects on postprandial glucose and lipid responses. AU - Sun,Lijuan, AU - Tan,Kevin Wei Jie, AU - Lim,Joseph Zhien, AU - Magkos,Faidon, AU - Henry,Christiani Jeyakumar, Y1 - 2016/10/21/ PY - 2016/04/14/received PY - 2016/09/19/accepted PY - 2016/10/23/pubmed PY - 2018/8/28/medline PY - 2016/10/23/entrez KW - Carbohydrate KW - Dietary fat KW - Mixed meal KW - Postprandial response KW - Rice SP - 243 EP - 250 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 57 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: The magnitude of postprandial lipemia is influenced not only by the amount but also the type of fat and carbohydrate consumed. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in postprandial glucose and lipid responses after a mixed meal containing low- or high-glycemic-index (GI) carbohydrate and three different types of fat varying in the degree of saturation in healthy subjects. METHODS: A randomized, controlled, single-blinded crossover study was conducted in 20 healthy Chinese men. Subjects consumed in random order six experimental isocaloric meals that differed in carbohydrate and fat quality, and contained 40 g of either saturated fat (SFA, butter), monounsaturated fat (MUFA, olive oil) or polyunsaturated fat (PUFA, grapeseed oil), and 50 g of either low-GI (basmati rice) or high-GI (jasmine rice) carbohydrate. Glucose, insulin, c-peptide, triglycerides (TG) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were measured over 4 h. RESULTS: For all substrates evaluated, there were no significant interactions between fat and carbohydrate. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for TG was significantly lower after the SFA and PUFA meals compared with the MUFA meal, irrespective of GI. No significant difference was found for NEFA iAUC in all treatments. Glucose, insulin and c-peptide iAUCs were significantly lower after ingestion of low-GI than high-GI meals, independent of the type of fat. CONCLUSIONS: A carbohydrate-rich meal (of either low or high GI) that contains butter or grapeseed oil results in lower postprandial TG concentrations relative to olive oil in healthy Chinese males. Glucose, insulin and c-peptide responses, however, are directly dependent on the GI of the meal and not on the degree of saturation of dietary fat. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02585427. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27770188/Dietary_fat_and_carbohydrate_quality_have_independent_effects_on_postprandial_glucose_and_lipid_responses_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-016-1313-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -