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tDCS over left M1 or DLPFC does not improve learning of a bimanual coordination task.
Sci Rep 2016; 6:35739SR

Abstract

Previously, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) has resulted in improved performance in simple motor tasks. For a complex bimanual movement, studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation indicated the involvement of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as well as left M1. Here we investigated the relative effect of up-regulating the cortical function in left DLPFC and left M1 with tDCS. Participants practised a complex bimanual task over four days while receiving either of five stimulation protocols: anodal tDCS applied over M1, anodal tDCS over DLPFC, sham tDCS over M1, sham tDCS over DLPFC, or no stimulation. Performance was measured at the start and end of each training day to make a distinction between acquisition and consolidation. Although task performance improved over days, no significant difference between stimulation protocols was observed, suggesting that anodal tDCS had little effect on learning the bimanual task regardless of the stimulation sites and learning phase (acquisition or consolidation). Interestingly, cognitive performance as well as corticomotor excitability did not change following stimulation. Accordingly, we found no evidence for behavioural or neurophysiological changes following tDCS over left M1 or left DLPFC in learning a complex bimanual task.

Authors+Show Affiliations

KU Leuven, Department of Kinesiology, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Newcastle University, Institute of Neuroscience, Framlington Place, NE2 4HH, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom.KU Leuven, Department of Kinesiology, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. University Hasselt, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Rehabilitation Research Center, Agoralaan building D, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium.KU Leuven, Department of Kinesiology, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.KU Leuven, Department of Kinesiology, Movement Control and Neuroplasticity Research Group, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Murdoch University, School of Psychology and Exercise Science, South Street Campus, 90 South Street, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27779192

Citation

Vancleef, Kathleen, et al. "TDCS Over Left M1 or DLPFC Does Not Improve Learning of a Bimanual Coordination Task." Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 2016, p. 35739.
Vancleef K, Meesen R, Swinnen SP, et al. TDCS over left M1 or DLPFC does not improve learning of a bimanual coordination task. Sci Rep. 2016;6:35739.
Vancleef, K., Meesen, R., Swinnen, S. P., & Fujiyama, H. (2016). TDCS over left M1 or DLPFC does not improve learning of a bimanual coordination task. Scientific Reports, 6, p. 35739. doi:10.1038/srep35739.
Vancleef K, et al. TDCS Over Left M1 or DLPFC Does Not Improve Learning of a Bimanual Coordination Task. Sci Rep. 2016 10 25;6:35739. PubMed PMID: 27779192.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - tDCS over left M1 or DLPFC does not improve learning of a bimanual coordination task. AU - Vancleef,Kathleen, AU - Meesen,Raf, AU - Swinnen,Stephan P, AU - Fujiyama,Hakuei, Y1 - 2016/10/25/ PY - 2016/06/27/received PY - 2016/10/04/accepted PY - 2016/10/26/pubmed PY - 2018/4/24/medline PY - 2016/10/26/entrez SP - 35739 EP - 35739 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 6 N2 - Previously, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) has resulted in improved performance in simple motor tasks. For a complex bimanual movement, studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation indicated the involvement of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as well as left M1. Here we investigated the relative effect of up-regulating the cortical function in left DLPFC and left M1 with tDCS. Participants practised a complex bimanual task over four days while receiving either of five stimulation protocols: anodal tDCS applied over M1, anodal tDCS over DLPFC, sham tDCS over M1, sham tDCS over DLPFC, or no stimulation. Performance was measured at the start and end of each training day to make a distinction between acquisition and consolidation. Although task performance improved over days, no significant difference between stimulation protocols was observed, suggesting that anodal tDCS had little effect on learning the bimanual task regardless of the stimulation sites and learning phase (acquisition or consolidation). Interestingly, cognitive performance as well as corticomotor excitability did not change following stimulation. Accordingly, we found no evidence for behavioural or neurophysiological changes following tDCS over left M1 or left DLPFC in learning a complex bimanual task. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27779192/tDCS_over_left_M1_or_DLPFC_does_not_improve_learning_of_a_bimanual_coordination_task_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep35739 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -