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Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2017; 126(1):54-60AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We studied the clinical characteristics, nystagmographic findings, and treatment outcome of a group of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to mild head trauma and compared them with a group of patients with idiopathic BPPV.

METHODS

The medical records of 33 patients with BPPV associated with mild head trauma were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic, and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Three hundred and twenty patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group.

RESULTS

The patients with BPPV secondary to mild head trauma presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) lower mean age, with more intense symptoms; (2) increased rate of horizontal and anterior semicircular canal involvement and frequent multiple canal and bilateral involvement; (3) greater incidence of canal paresis and presence of spontaneous nystagmus; (4) poorer treatment results, attributed mainly to coexisting canal paresis in many patients, and higher rate of recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with mild head trauma differs from idiopathic BPPV in terms of several epidemiological and clinical features; it responds less effectively to treatment and is prone to recurrence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece dbalats@hotmail.com.ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece.ENT Department, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus.ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece.ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece.ENT Department, General Hospital Asklepieio Voulas, Voula, Greece.ENT Department, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27780909

Citation

Balatsouras, Dimitrios G., et al. "Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma." The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, vol. 126, no. 1, 2017, pp. 54-60.
Balatsouras DG, Koukoutsis G, Aspris A, et al. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2017;126(1):54-60.
Balatsouras, D. G., Koukoutsis, G., Aspris, A., Fassolis, A., Moukos, A., Economou, N. C., & Katotomichelakis, M. (2017). Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma. The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 126(1), pp. 54-60.
Balatsouras DG, et al. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2017;126(1):54-60. PubMed PMID: 27780909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma. AU - Balatsouras,Dimitrios G, AU - Koukoutsis,George, AU - Aspris,Andreas, AU - Fassolis,Alexandros, AU - Moukos,Antonis, AU - Economou,Nicolas C, AU - Katotomichelakis,Michael, Y1 - 2016/10/25/ PY - 2016/10/27/pubmed PY - 2017/1/24/medline PY - 2016/10/27/entrez KW - benign paroxysmal positional vertigo KW - canalith repositioning procedure KW - head trauma KW - hearing loss KW - nystagmography KW - vertigo SP - 54 EP - 60 JF - The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology JO - Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol. VL - 126 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We studied the clinical characteristics, nystagmographic findings, and treatment outcome of a group of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to mild head trauma and compared them with a group of patients with idiopathic BPPV. METHODS: The medical records of 33 patients with BPPV associated with mild head trauma were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic, and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Three hundred and twenty patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group. RESULTS: The patients with BPPV secondary to mild head trauma presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) lower mean age, with more intense symptoms; (2) increased rate of horizontal and anterior semicircular canal involvement and frequent multiple canal and bilateral involvement; (3) greater incidence of canal paresis and presence of spontaneous nystagmus; (4) poorer treatment results, attributed mainly to coexisting canal paresis in many patients, and higher rate of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with mild head trauma differs from idiopathic BPPV in terms of several epidemiological and clinical features; it responds less effectively to treatment and is prone to recurrence. SN - 1943-572X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27780909/Benign_Paroxysmal_Positional_Vertigo_Secondary_to_Mild_Head_Trauma_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003489416674961?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -