Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Concurrent polysubstance use in a longitudinal study of US youth: associations with sexual orientation.
Addiction. 2017 04; 112(4):614-624.A

Abstract

AIMS

To estimate longitudinal associations between self-reported sexual orientation and past-year polysubstance use among youth, and test how gender, age and early onset of tobacco and alcohol use contributed to variation in polysubstance use.

DESIGN

Longitudinal community-based cohort of US adolescents from the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS 1) (n = 16 873) followed from ages 12-29 years.

SETTING

United States of America.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 13 519 individuals (7839 females; 5680 males) who responded to at least one of five self-administered questionnaires from 1999 to 2010. Ninety-three per cent reported their race/ethnicity as non-Hispanic white.

MEASUREMENTS

Multivariable repeated measures generalized estimating equations estimated relative risks (RRs) of concurrent polysubstance use (i.e. past 12-month use of three or more substances) comparing sexual orientation minority youth [i.e. mostly heterosexual (MH), bisexual (BI), gay/lesbian (GL)] to their same-gender, completely heterosexual (CH) counterparts. Mediation analyses tested whether early onset of tobacco and/or alcohol use explained relationships between sexual orientation and concurrent polysubstance use.

FINDINGS

Compared with their same-gender CH peers, sexual minorities evidenced higher risk for concurrent polysubstance use over all repeated measures [risk ratios (RRs) for sexual minority subgroups: from 1.63-2.91, P-values: <0.001] and for all age groups (RRs: from 1.50-4.04, P-values: < 0.05-< 0.001), except GL males aged 18-20 years. Differences between sexual minorities and CHs were larger among females than males (P-values for sexual orientation × gender interactions were < 0.05 for MHs and BIs), and among younger versus older ages (P-values for sexual orientation × age interactions were < 0.05, except for BI males). Sexual minorities' younger age of smoking and/or drinking initiation contributed to their elevated polysubstance use (% of effect explained was between 9.4-24.3, P-values: 0.04-< 0.001), except among GL males.

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual minority youth in the United States, and in particular younger females, appear to be at disproportionate risk for concurrent past-year polysubstance use. Early onset of smoking and drinking may contribute to elevated risk of polysubstance use among sexual minorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, William Paterson University New Jersey, Wayne, NJ, USA.Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Fenway Health, The Fenway Institute, Boston, MA, USA.Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27790758

Citation

Kecojevic, Aleksandar, et al. "Concurrent Polysubstance Use in a Longitudinal Study of US Youth: Associations With Sexual Orientation." Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 112, no. 4, 2017, pp. 614-624.
Kecojevic A, Jun HJ, Reisner SL, et al. Concurrent polysubstance use in a longitudinal study of US youth: associations with sexual orientation. Addiction. 2017;112(4):614-624.
Kecojevic, A., Jun, H. J., Reisner, S. L., & Corliss, H. L. (2017). Concurrent polysubstance use in a longitudinal study of US youth: associations with sexual orientation. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 112(4), 614-624. https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13681
Kecojevic A, et al. Concurrent Polysubstance Use in a Longitudinal Study of US Youth: Associations With Sexual Orientation. Addiction. 2017;112(4):614-624. PubMed PMID: 27790758.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concurrent polysubstance use in a longitudinal study of US youth: associations with sexual orientation. AU - Kecojevic,Aleksandar, AU - Jun,Hee-Jin, AU - Reisner,Sari L, AU - Corliss,Heather L, Y1 - 2016/12/09/ PY - 2016/03/30/received PY - 2016/06/29/revised PY - 2016/10/26/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2018/2/27/medline PY - 2016/10/30/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - early onset of substance use KW - emerging adults KW - longitudinal study KW - polysubstance use KW - sexual orientation SP - 614 EP - 624 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 112 IS - 4 N2 - AIMS: To estimate longitudinal associations between self-reported sexual orientation and past-year polysubstance use among youth, and test how gender, age and early onset of tobacco and alcohol use contributed to variation in polysubstance use. DESIGN: Longitudinal community-based cohort of US adolescents from the Growing Up Today Study (GUTS 1) (n = 16 873) followed from ages 12-29 years. SETTING: United States of America. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 13 519 individuals (7839 females; 5680 males) who responded to at least one of five self-administered questionnaires from 1999 to 2010. Ninety-three per cent reported their race/ethnicity as non-Hispanic white. MEASUREMENTS: Multivariable repeated measures generalized estimating equations estimated relative risks (RRs) of concurrent polysubstance use (i.e. past 12-month use of three or more substances) comparing sexual orientation minority youth [i.e. mostly heterosexual (MH), bisexual (BI), gay/lesbian (GL)] to their same-gender, completely heterosexual (CH) counterparts. Mediation analyses tested whether early onset of tobacco and/or alcohol use explained relationships between sexual orientation and concurrent polysubstance use. FINDINGS: Compared with their same-gender CH peers, sexual minorities evidenced higher risk for concurrent polysubstance use over all repeated measures [risk ratios (RRs) for sexual minority subgroups: from 1.63-2.91, P-values: <0.001] and for all age groups (RRs: from 1.50-4.04, P-values: < 0.05-< 0.001), except GL males aged 18-20 years. Differences between sexual minorities and CHs were larger among females than males (P-values for sexual orientation × gender interactions were < 0.05 for MHs and BIs), and among younger versus older ages (P-values for sexual orientation × age interactions were < 0.05, except for BI males). Sexual minorities' younger age of smoking and/or drinking initiation contributed to their elevated polysubstance use (% of effect explained was between 9.4-24.3, P-values: 0.04-< 0.001), except among GL males. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority youth in the United States, and in particular younger females, appear to be at disproportionate risk for concurrent past-year polysubstance use. Early onset of smoking and drinking may contribute to elevated risk of polysubstance use among sexual minorities. SN - 1360-0443 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27790758/Concurrent_polysubstance_use_in_a_longitudinal_study_of_US_youth:_associations_with_sexual_orientation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/add.13681 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -