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Effect of anthelminthic treatment on helminth infection and related anaemia among school-age children in northwestern Ethiopia.
BMC Infect Dis. 2016 10 28; 16(1):613.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Information about improvements in the health status of population at-risk of helminth infection after anthelminthic treatment helps to evaluate the effectiveness of the large scale deworming program. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of anthelminthic treatment on the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminth infection, haemoglobin level and prevalence of anaemia among school-age children.

METHODS

A total of 403 children attending Tikur Wuha Elementary School in Jiga, northwestern Ethiopia were enrolled in this study between February and March 2011. Formol-ether concentration and Kato-Katz methods were used to examine stool for intestinal helminth infections at baseline and one month after anthelminthic treatment. Haemoglobin level was measured using Hemocue machine at baseline and one month after anthelminthic treatment.

RESULTS

Out of 403 school children examined, 15.4 % were anaemic and 58.3 % were infected with intestinal helminths at baseline. Hookworms (46.9 %), Schistosoma mansoni (24.6 %), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.2 %) and Trichuris trichiura (1.7 %) infections were common. The odds of anaemia was higher among children infected with helminths (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.83, 95 % CI = 1.92, 7.62) especially in those infected with hookworm (aOR = 2.42, 95 % CI = 1.34, 4.39) or S. mansoni (aOR = 2.67, 95 % CI = 1.46, 4.88) and two or more helminth species (aOR = 7.31, 95 % CI = 3.27, 16.35) than those uninfected with intestinal helminths at baseline. Significant reduction in prevalence of helminth infection (77.0 %) and increment in mean haemoglobin level (+3.65 g/l) of children infected with helminths was observed one month after anthelminthic treatment. The increase in haemoglobin level after anthelminthic treatment was significantly positively associated with the age, but negatively associated with the haemoglobin level at baseline. The change in mean haemoglobin level was significantly higher among undernourished than normal children. Percent reduction in the prevalence of anaemia among children infected with helminths was 25.4 % after anthelminthic treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study provides evidence that anthelminthic treatment of school-age children infected with intestinal helminth can improve haemoglobin level in addition to reducing the prevalence and intensity of helminth infections one month after treatment. This suggests that deworming of children may benefit the health of children in sub-Sharan Africa where hookworm and S. mansoni infections are prevalent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences, Woldia University, P.o. box. 400, Woldia, Ethiopia.Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stemple College of Public Health, Florida International University, Miami, USA. abrahamdegarege@yahoo.com. Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. abrahamdegarege@yahoo.com.Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27793110

Citation

Yimam, Yonas, et al. "Effect of Anthelminthic Treatment On Helminth Infection and Related Anaemia Among School-age Children in Northwestern Ethiopia." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 16, no. 1, 2016, p. 613.
Yimam Y, Degarege A, Erko B. Effect of anthelminthic treatment on helminth infection and related anaemia among school-age children in northwestern Ethiopia. BMC Infect Dis. 2016;16(1):613.
Yimam, Y., Degarege, A., & Erko, B. (2016). Effect of anthelminthic treatment on helminth infection and related anaemia among school-age children in northwestern Ethiopia. BMC Infectious Diseases, 16(1), 613.
Yimam Y, Degarege A, Erko B. Effect of Anthelminthic Treatment On Helminth Infection and Related Anaemia Among School-age Children in Northwestern Ethiopia. BMC Infect Dis. 2016 10 28;16(1):613. PubMed PMID: 27793110.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of anthelminthic treatment on helminth infection and related anaemia among school-age children in northwestern Ethiopia. AU - Yimam,Yonas, AU - Degarege,Abraham, AU - Erko,Berhanu, Y1 - 2016/10/28/ PY - 2016/01/04/received PY - 2016/10/25/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2017/6/13/medline PY - 2016/10/30/entrez KW - Anaemia KW - Anthelminthic treatment KW - Ethiopia KW - Haemoglobin KW - Helminths SP - 613 EP - 613 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect Dis VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Information about improvements in the health status of population at-risk of helminth infection after anthelminthic treatment helps to evaluate the effectiveness of the large scale deworming program. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of anthelminthic treatment on the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminth infection, haemoglobin level and prevalence of anaemia among school-age children. METHODS: A total of 403 children attending Tikur Wuha Elementary School in Jiga, northwestern Ethiopia were enrolled in this study between February and March 2011. Formol-ether concentration and Kato-Katz methods were used to examine stool for intestinal helminth infections at baseline and one month after anthelminthic treatment. Haemoglobin level was measured using Hemocue machine at baseline and one month after anthelminthic treatment. RESULTS: Out of 403 school children examined, 15.4 % were anaemic and 58.3 % were infected with intestinal helminths at baseline. Hookworms (46.9 %), Schistosoma mansoni (24.6 %), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.2 %) and Trichuris trichiura (1.7 %) infections were common. The odds of anaemia was higher among children infected with helminths (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.83, 95 % CI = 1.92, 7.62) especially in those infected with hookworm (aOR = 2.42, 95 % CI = 1.34, 4.39) or S. mansoni (aOR = 2.67, 95 % CI = 1.46, 4.88) and two or more helminth species (aOR = 7.31, 95 % CI = 3.27, 16.35) than those uninfected with intestinal helminths at baseline. Significant reduction in prevalence of helminth infection (77.0 %) and increment in mean haemoglobin level (+3.65 g/l) of children infected with helminths was observed one month after anthelminthic treatment. The increase in haemoglobin level after anthelminthic treatment was significantly positively associated with the age, but negatively associated with the haemoglobin level at baseline. The change in mean haemoglobin level was significantly higher among undernourished than normal children. Percent reduction in the prevalence of anaemia among children infected with helminths was 25.4 % after anthelminthic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides evidence that anthelminthic treatment of school-age children infected with intestinal helminth can improve haemoglobin level in addition to reducing the prevalence and intensity of helminth infections one month after treatment. This suggests that deworming of children may benefit the health of children in sub-Sharan Africa where hookworm and S. mansoni infections are prevalent. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27793110/Effect_of_anthelminthic_treatment_on_helminth_infection_and_related_anaemia_among_school_age_children_in_northwestern_Ethiopia_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-016-1956-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -