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Evolving methods to combine cognitive and physical training for individuals with mild cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomized controlled study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonpharmacologic interventions, such as cognitive training or physical exercise, are effective in improving cognitive functions for older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Some researchers have proposed that combining physical exercise with cognitive training may augment the benefits of cognition. However, strong evidence is lacking regarding whether a combined therapy is superior to a single type of training for older adults with MCI. Moreover, which combination approach - combining physical exercise with cognitive training sequentially or simultaneously - is more advantageous for cognitive improvement is not yet clear. This proposed study is designed to clarify these questions.

METHODS/DESIGN

This study is a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Eighty individuals with MCI will be recruited and randomly assigned to cognitive training (COG), physical exercise training (PE), sequential training (SEQ), and dual-task training (DUAL) groups. The intervention programs will be 90 min/day, 2-3 days/week, for a total of 36 training sessions. The participants in the SEQ group will first perform 45 min of physical exercise followed by 45 min of cognitive training, whereas those in the DUAL group will perform physical exercise and cognitive training simultaneously. Participants will be assessed at baseline, after the intervention, and at 6-month follow-up. The primary cognitive outcome tests will include the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the color-naming Stroop test. Other outcomes will include assessments that evaluate the cognitive, physical, and daily functions of older adults with MCI.

DISCUSSION

The results of this proposed study will provide important information regarding the feasibility and intervention effects of combining physical exercise and cognitive training for older individuals with MCI.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02512627 , registered on 20 July 2015.

Links

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

    ,

    Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wenhua 1st Rd, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan. cywu@mail.cgu.edu.tw. Healthy Ageing Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. cywu@mail.cgu.edu.tw. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan. cywu@mail.cgu.edu.tw.

    ,

    Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wenhua 1st Rd, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan.

    ,

    Department of Neurology and Dementia Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

    ,

    Division of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

    Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wenhua 1st Rd, Taoyuan, 333, Taiwan.

    Source

    Trials 17:1 2016 10 28 pg 526

    MeSH

    Activities of Daily Living
    China
    Clinical Protocols
    Cognition
    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
    Cognitive Dysfunction
    Combined Modality Therapy
    Exercise Test
    Exercise Therapy
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Quality of Life
    Research Design
    Single-Blind Method
    Social Participation
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Time Factors
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    27793183

    Citation

    Lee, Ya-Yun, et al. "Evolving Methods to Combine Cognitive and Physical Training for Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Study." Trials, vol. 17, no. 1, 2016, p. 526.
    Lee YY, Wu CY, Teng CH, et al. Evolving methods to combine cognitive and physical training for individuals with mild cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomized controlled study. Trials. 2016;17(1):526.
    Lee, Y. Y., Wu, C. Y., Teng, C. H., Hsu, W. C., Chang, K. C., & Chen, P. (2016). Evolving methods to combine cognitive and physical training for individuals with mild cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomized controlled study. Trials, 17(1), p. 526.
    Lee YY, et al. Evolving Methods to Combine Cognitive and Physical Training for Individuals With Mild Cognitive Impairment: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Study. Trials. 2016 10 28;17(1):526. PubMed PMID: 27793183.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Evolving methods to combine cognitive and physical training for individuals with mild cognitive impairment: study protocol for a randomized controlled study. AU - Lee,Ya-Yun, AU - Wu,Ching-Yi, AU - Teng,Ching-Hung, AU - Hsu,Wen-Chuin, AU - Chang,Ku-Chou, AU - Chen,Poyu, Y1 - 2016/10/28/ PY - 2016/05/05/received PY - 2016/10/08/accepted PY - 2016/10/30/pubmed PY - 2018/1/6/medline PY - 2016/10/30/entrez KW - Cognitive training KW - Hybrid therapy KW - Mild cognitive impairment KW - Physical exercise SP - 526 EP - 526 JF - Trials JO - Trials VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonpharmacologic interventions, such as cognitive training or physical exercise, are effective in improving cognitive functions for older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Some researchers have proposed that combining physical exercise with cognitive training may augment the benefits of cognition. However, strong evidence is lacking regarding whether a combined therapy is superior to a single type of training for older adults with MCI. Moreover, which combination approach - combining physical exercise with cognitive training sequentially or simultaneously - is more advantageous for cognitive improvement is not yet clear. This proposed study is designed to clarify these questions. METHODS/DESIGN: This study is a single-blinded, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Eighty individuals with MCI will be recruited and randomly assigned to cognitive training (COG), physical exercise training (PE), sequential training (SEQ), and dual-task training (DUAL) groups. The intervention programs will be 90 min/day, 2-3 days/week, for a total of 36 training sessions. The participants in the SEQ group will first perform 45 min of physical exercise followed by 45 min of cognitive training, whereas those in the DUAL group will perform physical exercise and cognitive training simultaneously. Participants will be assessed at baseline, after the intervention, and at 6-month follow-up. The primary cognitive outcome tests will include the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the color-naming Stroop test. Other outcomes will include assessments that evaluate the cognitive, physical, and daily functions of older adults with MCI. DISCUSSION: The results of this proposed study will provide important information regarding the feasibility and intervention effects of combining physical exercise and cognitive training for older individuals with MCI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02512627 , registered on 20 July 2015. SN - 1745-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27793183/Evolving_methods_to_combine_cognitive_and_physical_training_for_individuals_with_mild_cognitive_impairment:_study_protocol_for_a_randomized_controlled_study_ L2 - https://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13063-016-1650-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -