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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.

OBJECTIVE

The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.

DESIGN

The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.

RESULTS

Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.

CONCLUSION

Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway. Faculty of Health Science, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Science, Oslo, Norway; astrid.eriksen@hioa.no.Department of Community Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Department of Public Health, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Community Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27802844

Citation

Eriksen, Astrid M A., et al. "Childhood Violence and Adult Chronic Pain Among Indigenous Sami and non-Sami Populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 Questionnaire Study." International Journal of Circumpolar Health, vol. 75, 2016, p. 32798.
Eriksen AM, Schei B, Hansen KL, et al. Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798.
Eriksen, A. M., Schei, B., Hansen, K. L., Sørlie, T., Fleten, N., & Javo, C. (2016). Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 75, 32798. https://doi.org/10.3402/ijch.v75.32798
Eriksen AM, et al. Childhood Violence and Adult Chronic Pain Among Indigenous Sami and non-Sami Populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 Questionnaire Study. Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798. PubMed PMID: 27802844.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study. AU - Eriksen,Astrid M A, AU - Schei,Berit, AU - Hansen,Ketil Lenert, AU - Sørlie,Tore, AU - Fleten,Nils, AU - Javo,Cecilie, Y1 - 2016/10/31/ PY - 2016/07/05/received PY - 2016/09/26/revised PY - 2016/09/28/accepted PY - 2016/11/3/pubmed PY - 2018/1/27/medline PY - 2016/11/3/entrez KW - Norway KW - SAMINOR 2 study KW - Sami KW - child abuse KW - childhood emotional KW - chronic pain KW - ethnicity KW - indigenous KW - physical KW - sexual violence SP - 32798 EP - 32798 JF - International journal of circumpolar health JO - Int J Circumpolar Health VL - 75 N2 - BACKGROUND: Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. OBJECTIVE: The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. DESIGN: The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. RESULTS: Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. CONCLUSION: Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity. SN - 2242-3982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27802844/Childhood_violence_and_adult_chronic_pain_among_indigenous_Sami_and_non_Sami_populations_in_Norway:_a_SAMINOR_2_questionnaire_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/ijch.v75.32798 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -