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Dietary magnesium and calcium intake and risk of depression in the general population: A meta-analysis.
Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2017; 51(3):219-229AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations between dietary magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) intake and the risk of depression. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to explore these associations and to investigate the possible dose-response relationship between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression.

METHODS

MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan fang databases and Databases of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals were searched for eligible publications up to September 2016. Pooled relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects model. Publication bias was estimated using Egger's test and the funnel plot. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline functions.

RESULTS

A total of 17 epidemiological studies from 12 articles were included in the present meta-analysis. Among these studies, 11 studies evaluated the association between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression and 6 studies evaluated the association between dietary Ca intake and risk of depression. When comparing the highest with the lowest intake, the pooled relative risks of depression were 0.81 (95% confidence interval = [0.70, 0.92]) for Mg and 0.66 (95% confidence interval = [0.42, 1.02]) for Ca. Dietary Mg intake was significantly associated with a reduced risk of depression among studies conducted in Asia (relative risk = 0.57; 95% confidence interval = [0.44, 0.74]) and in studies adjusting for energy intake (relative risk = 0.73; 95% confidence interval = [0.58, 0.92]). For dose-response analysis, evidence of a nonlinear relationship was found between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression, and the largest risk reductions were observed for 320 mg/day.

CONCLUSION

This meta-analysis indicated that moderate Mg intake may be inversely associated with the risk of depression, which still needs to be confirmed by larger prospective cohort studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.2 Department of Nutrition, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.1 Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.1 Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Qingdao University, Qingdao, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27807012

Citation

Li, Bingrong, et al. "Dietary Magnesium and Calcium Intake and Risk of Depression in the General Population: a Meta-analysis." The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 51, no. 3, 2017, pp. 219-229.
Li B, Lv J, Wang W, et al. Dietary magnesium and calcium intake and risk of depression in the general population: A meta-analysis. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2017;51(3):219-229.
Li, B., Lv, J., Wang, W., & Zhang, D. (2017). Dietary magnesium and calcium intake and risk of depression in the general population: A meta-analysis. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51(3), pp. 219-229. doi:10.1177/0004867416676895.
Li B, et al. Dietary Magnesium and Calcium Intake and Risk of Depression in the General Population: a Meta-analysis. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2017;51(3):219-229. PubMed PMID: 27807012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary magnesium and calcium intake and risk of depression in the general population: A meta-analysis. AU - Li,Bingrong, AU - Lv,Jing, AU - Wang,Weijing, AU - Zhang,Dongfeng, Y1 - 2016/11/02/ PY - 2016/11/4/pubmed PY - 2017/3/16/medline PY - 2016/11/4/entrez KW - Magnesium KW - calcium KW - depression KW - meta-analysis and dose–response analysis SP - 219 EP - 229 JF - The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry JO - Aust N Z J Psychiatry VL - 51 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations between dietary magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) intake and the risk of depression. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to explore these associations and to investigate the possible dose-response relationship between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression. METHODS: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan fang databases and Databases of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals were searched for eligible publications up to September 2016. Pooled relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects model. Publication bias was estimated using Egger's test and the funnel plot. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline functions. RESULTS: A total of 17 epidemiological studies from 12 articles were included in the present meta-analysis. Among these studies, 11 studies evaluated the association between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression and 6 studies evaluated the association between dietary Ca intake and risk of depression. When comparing the highest with the lowest intake, the pooled relative risks of depression were 0.81 (95% confidence interval = [0.70, 0.92]) for Mg and 0.66 (95% confidence interval = [0.42, 1.02]) for Ca. Dietary Mg intake was significantly associated with a reduced risk of depression among studies conducted in Asia (relative risk = 0.57; 95% confidence interval = [0.44, 0.74]) and in studies adjusting for energy intake (relative risk = 0.73; 95% confidence interval = [0.58, 0.92]). For dose-response analysis, evidence of a nonlinear relationship was found between dietary Mg intake and risk of depression, and the largest risk reductions were observed for 320 mg/day. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis indicated that moderate Mg intake may be inversely associated with the risk of depression, which still needs to be confirmed by larger prospective cohort studies. SN - 1440-1614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27807012/Dietary_magnesium_and_calcium_intake_and_risk_of_depression_in_the_general_population:_A_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0004867416676895?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -