Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reinforcing and subjective effects of diazepam in nondrug-abusing volunteers.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1989 May; 33(1):205-13.PB

Abstract

Preference for diazepam was assessed in 18 light and 12 moderate social drinkers using a cumulative dosing procedure. The 7-session procedure consisted of: 1) four sampling sessions, during which participants ingested color-coded capsules containing either diazepam (five 4-mg capsules administered at 30-min intervals; total dose 20 mg) or placebo, and 2) three choice sessions, during which they could ingest up to 7 capsules of their preferred color of capsule, each separated by 30 min. Subjective (mood) and behavioral (performance) measures were obtained throughout the 4-hour sessions. The light social drinkers chose diazepam over placebo on 66% of the choice sessions, and ingested a mean dose per session of about 16 mg. The moderate drinkers chose diazepam on 100% of the choice sessions, and ingested an average dose of 25 mg per session. Diazepam produced sedation in both groups, but in the moderate drinkers it also increased measures of subjective effects suggestive of "euphoria." The results indicate that diazepam can serve as a positive reinforcer under laboratory conditions in nondrug-abusing individuals who are moderate users of alcohol and other drugs. Greater reinforcing efficacy may be indicative of higher risk of abuse. The results illustrate the usefulness of the cumulative dosing procedure to measure both drug preference and dose preference.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, IL 60637.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2780778

Citation

deWit, H, et al. "Reinforcing and Subjective Effects of Diazepam in Nondrug-abusing Volunteers." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 33, no. 1, 1989, pp. 205-13.
deWit H, Pierri J, Johanson CE. Reinforcing and subjective effects of diazepam in nondrug-abusing volunteers. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1989;33(1):205-13.
deWit, H., Pierri, J., & Johanson, C. E. (1989). Reinforcing and subjective effects of diazepam in nondrug-abusing volunteers. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 33(1), 205-13.
deWit H, Pierri J, Johanson CE. Reinforcing and Subjective Effects of Diazepam in Nondrug-abusing Volunteers. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1989;33(1):205-13. PubMed PMID: 2780778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reinforcing and subjective effects of diazepam in nondrug-abusing volunteers. AU - deWit,H, AU - Pierri,J, AU - Johanson,C E, PY - 1989/5/1/pubmed PY - 1989/5/1/medline PY - 1989/5/1/entrez SP - 205 EP - 13 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol Biochem Behav VL - 33 IS - 1 N2 - Preference for diazepam was assessed in 18 light and 12 moderate social drinkers using a cumulative dosing procedure. The 7-session procedure consisted of: 1) four sampling sessions, during which participants ingested color-coded capsules containing either diazepam (five 4-mg capsules administered at 30-min intervals; total dose 20 mg) or placebo, and 2) three choice sessions, during which they could ingest up to 7 capsules of their preferred color of capsule, each separated by 30 min. Subjective (mood) and behavioral (performance) measures were obtained throughout the 4-hour sessions. The light social drinkers chose diazepam over placebo on 66% of the choice sessions, and ingested a mean dose per session of about 16 mg. The moderate drinkers chose diazepam on 100% of the choice sessions, and ingested an average dose of 25 mg per session. Diazepam produced sedation in both groups, but in the moderate drinkers it also increased measures of subjective effects suggestive of "euphoria." The results indicate that diazepam can serve as a positive reinforcer under laboratory conditions in nondrug-abusing individuals who are moderate users of alcohol and other drugs. Greater reinforcing efficacy may be indicative of higher risk of abuse. The results illustrate the usefulness of the cumulative dosing procedure to measure both drug preference and dose preference. SN - 0091-3057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2780778/Reinforcing_and_subjective_effects_of_diazepam_in_nondrug_abusing_volunteers_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0091-3057(89)90451-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -