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Exposure of children to BPA through dust and the association of urinary BPA and triclosan with oxidative stress in Guangzhou, China.
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2016 Dec 08; 18(12):1492-1499.ES

Abstract

Both bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) are phenolic compounds widely used in a variety of household applications. These compounds could be released into the environment, enter the human body and cause a series of potential health hazards. Children are sensitive and susceptible to these contaminants. To investigate the potential oxidative DNA damage from exposure to BPA and TCS, ninety six urine samples of children (aged 3-6) and 57 dust samples were collected from a kindergarten in Guangzhou, China. The concentrations of urinary BPA, TCS and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage) in urine were determined using a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer. The geometric mean concentrations of urinary BPA, TCS and 8-OHdG were 1.08 μg L-1, 1.34 μg L-1 and 1.90 μg L-1, respectively. The results showed that both BPA and TCS exposures were associated with oxidative damage. Significant dose-effects existed between the urinary BPA, TCS levels and the 8-OHdG concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that one percent increase in BPA and in TCS could generate 0.15% and 0.081% increase in 8-OHdG in urine for children in Guangzhou. We also determined the concentrations of BPA in dust using high performance liquid chromatography. The mean concentration of BPA was 2.86 μg g-1 in indoor dust and 3.23 μg g-1 in outdoor dust. The dust contributes approximately 9.23% to the urinary BPA exposure for the children. In conclusion, BPA and TCS exposure correlates with oxidative DNA damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn.Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn.Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn.Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn.Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn.Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Subtropical Biodiversity and Biomonitoring, School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China. 20001047@m.scnu.edu.cn and Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environmental Exposure and Health, School of Environment, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China.Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055, China. lushaoyou2005@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27808329

Citation

Lv, Yanshan, et al. "Exposure of Children to BPA Through Dust and the Association of Urinary BPA and Triclosan With Oxidative Stress in Guangzhou, China." Environmental Science. Processes & Impacts, vol. 18, no. 12, 2016, pp. 1492-1499.
Lv Y, Rui C, Dai Y, et al. Exposure of children to BPA through dust and the association of urinary BPA and triclosan with oxidative stress in Guangzhou, China. Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2016;18(12):1492-1499.
Lv, Y., Rui, C., Dai, Y., Pang, Q., Li, Y., Fan, R., & Lu, S. (2016). Exposure of children to BPA through dust and the association of urinary BPA and triclosan with oxidative stress in Guangzhou, China. Environmental Science. Processes & Impacts, 18(12), 1492-1499.
Lv Y, et al. Exposure of Children to BPA Through Dust and the Association of Urinary BPA and Triclosan With Oxidative Stress in Guangzhou, China. Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2016 Dec 8;18(12):1492-1499. PubMed PMID: 27808329.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure of children to BPA through dust and the association of urinary BPA and triclosan with oxidative stress in Guangzhou, China. AU - Lv,Yanshan, AU - Rui,Caiyan, AU - Dai,Yanyan, AU - Pang,Qihua, AU - Li,Yanru, AU - Fan,Ruifang, AU - Lu,Shaoyou, PY - 2016/11/4/pubmed PY - 2017/2/28/medline PY - 2016/11/4/entrez SP - 1492 EP - 1499 JF - Environmental science. Processes & impacts JO - Environ Sci Process Impacts VL - 18 IS - 12 N2 - Both bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) are phenolic compounds widely used in a variety of household applications. These compounds could be released into the environment, enter the human body and cause a series of potential health hazards. Children are sensitive and susceptible to these contaminants. To investigate the potential oxidative DNA damage from exposure to BPA and TCS, ninety six urine samples of children (aged 3-6) and 57 dust samples were collected from a kindergarten in Guangzhou, China. The concentrations of urinary BPA, TCS and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage) in urine were determined using a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer. The geometric mean concentrations of urinary BPA, TCS and 8-OHdG were 1.08 μg L-1, 1.34 μg L-1 and 1.90 μg L-1, respectively. The results showed that both BPA and TCS exposures were associated with oxidative damage. Significant dose-effects existed between the urinary BPA, TCS levels and the 8-OHdG concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that one percent increase in BPA and in TCS could generate 0.15% and 0.081% increase in 8-OHdG in urine for children in Guangzhou. We also determined the concentrations of BPA in dust using high performance liquid chromatography. The mean concentration of BPA was 2.86 μg g-1 in indoor dust and 3.23 μg g-1 in outdoor dust. The dust contributes approximately 9.23% to the urinary BPA exposure for the children. In conclusion, BPA and TCS exposure correlates with oxidative DNA damage. SN - 2050-7895 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27808329/Exposure_of_children_to_BPA_through_dust_and_the_association_of_urinary_BPA_and_triclosan_with_oxidative_stress_in_Guangzhou_China_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c6em00472e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -