Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes.
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Nov 04; 16(1):435.BC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities.

METHODS

Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined.

RESULTS

Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of the extracts did not correlate with the total phenolic, total flavonoid, FRAP or DPPH. For ACE inhibition, IC50 values ranged between 266.27 ± 6.91 to 695.17 ± 15.38 μg/mL.

CONCLUSIONS

The tested Australian medicinal plant extracts inhibit glucose-induced fluorescent AGEs, α-amylase, α-glucosidase and ACE with extracts of Petalostigma species showing the most promising activity. These medicinal plants could potentially be further developed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of hyperglycaemia and hypertension.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia.School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia. Current address: Foodplus Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 5064, Australia.School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia.Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation, PMB 30, Cairns Mail Centre, Cairns, Queensland, 4870, Australia.Chuulangun Aboriginal Corporation, PMB 30, Cairns Mail Centre, Cairns, Queensland, 4870, Australia.Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, Australia.School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia.School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia. susan.semple@unisa.edu.au. Quality Use of Medicines and Pharmacy Research Centre, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia. susan.semple@unisa.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

27809834

Citation

Deo, Permal, et al. "In Vitro Inhibitory Activities of Selected Australian Medicinal Plant Extracts Against Protein Glycation, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) and Digestive Enzymes Linked to Type II Diabetes." BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 16, no. 1, 2016, p. 435.
Deo P, Hewawasam E, Karakoulakis A, et al. In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016;16(1):435.
Deo, P., Hewawasam, E., Karakoulakis, A., Claudie, D. J., Nelson, R., Simpson, B. S., Smith, N. M., & Semple, S. J. (2016). In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 16(1), 435.
Deo P, et al. In Vitro Inhibitory Activities of Selected Australian Medicinal Plant Extracts Against Protein Glycation, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) and Digestive Enzymes Linked to Type II Diabetes. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Nov 4;16(1):435. PubMed PMID: 27809834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes. AU - Deo,Permal, AU - Hewawasam,Erandi, AU - Karakoulakis,Aris, AU - Claudie,David J, AU - Nelson,Robert, AU - Simpson,Bradley S, AU - Smith,Nicholas M, AU - Semple,Susan J, Y1 - 2016/11/04/ PY - 2016/06/22/received PY - 2016/09/29/accepted PY - 2016/11/5/pubmed PY - 2017/2/17/medline PY - 2016/11/5/entrez KW - Aboriginal KW - Angiotensin converting enzyme KW - Antiglycation KW - Antioxidant activities KW - Flavonoids KW - Local knowledge KW - Phenolics KW - Traditional medicine KW - α-amylase KW - α-glucosidase SP - 435 EP - 435 JF - BMC complementary and alternative medicine JO - BMC Complement Altern Med VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities. METHODS: Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined. RESULTS: Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of the extracts did not correlate with the total phenolic, total flavonoid, FRAP or DPPH. For ACE inhibition, IC50 values ranged between 266.27 ± 6.91 to 695.17 ± 15.38 μg/mL. CONCLUSIONS: The tested Australian medicinal plant extracts inhibit glucose-induced fluorescent AGEs, α-amylase, α-glucosidase and ACE with extracts of Petalostigma species showing the most promising activity. These medicinal plants could potentially be further developed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. SN - 1472-6882 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/27809834/In_vitro_inhibitory_activities_of_selected_Australian_medicinal_plant_extracts_against_protein_glycation_angiotensin_converting_enzyme__ACE__and_digestive_enzymes_linked_to_type_II_diabetes_ L2 - https://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12906-016-1421-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -